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Psychology Learning Tables | 5

Thursday, March 8th, 2018

It’s been a while since I’ve posted any Psychology Learning Tables (Knowledge Organisers by any other name) so I thought I’d make a start on the backlog I’ve collected so far (if you want to see the previous Tables you can find them here).

If you’re unfamiliar with the format, Learning Tables are used to summarise a section of the course onto a single sheet of A4 (although some Tables do take minor liberties with this basic format). While the general focus is, as the name suggests, “knowledge” many of these tables interpret this quite widely to include examples, applications and evaluation.

Which, as far as I can see, is Quite A Good Thing.

If you’re not as convinced – or you want to edit the information contained in each Table to your own particular teaching and learning preference – I’ve left the Tables in Word format for your editing pleasure.

Slavishly following the precedent I foolishly set for myself, this next batch of Tables are in no particular order other than alphabetical:

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Knowledge Organisers: Media and Methods and Education

Tuesday, February 20th, 2018

Back by popular demand and with a brand-spanking new set of Tables covering media, methods and education. Each Unit is by a different author and the quality is, at times, variable.

Media

These are pdf files so unless you’ve got a programme that will edit them you’re stuck with the information they have to offer. That said, they’re fairly recent (2015) and so are probably reasonably up-to-date and in line with the latest Specifications. There is, unfortunately, no indication of authorship…

Ownership of the mass media
New media, globalisation and popular culture
Selection and presentation of news and moral panics
Mass media and audiences
Representations of the body
Representations of ethnicity age and class

Methods

These are a little older (2009) and again authorship is a little hazy. On the plus side they’re in Word format so they can be easily edited if necessary.

Experiments and Questionnaires
Interviews
Observation and Secondary Sources

Previous Tables you might find useful:

Table 1.

Table 2.

Table 3.

Education

Again, not sure who created these or indeed when they were created. However, they are in Word format if you want to edit them.

Functionalism and Marxism
Feminism, New Right, Interactionism
Cultural and Material Factors

Previous Tables you might find useful:

Table 1.

Table 2.

 

More Sociology Knowledge Organisers

Wednesday, February 14th, 2018

Knowledge Organisers, you may or may not be surprised to learn, are the classroom requirement de nos jours and while some (looking at you Michaela Community School) may like to casually lay claim to the concept / format as being something radically new and different they’ve developed, it really isn’t.

Here, for example, is one I made earlier (about 20-odd years earlier…) and if past experience is anything to go by I probably stole the idea from someone else (or, as I like to think, my efforts were influenced by those of others).

Be that as it may, if you’ve landed here looking for Knowledge Organisers, here’s another batch I’ve managed to find using my finely-tuned Sociological Sensibility (or “typing stuff into Google to see what I can find” as it’s more-commonly known. Probably).

These KO’s are slightly different to the various Learning Tables (LT) we’ve previously posted, but they are, to-all-intents-and-purposes, the same in terms of what they exist to do.

You will find, if you compare the two (otherwise you’ll never actually know), this batch is a little less ambitious in scope and design than the previous LT’s, so it may be a case of choosing which suits you and your students and sticking with those. Or not as the case may be.

Although the original files I found were in pdf format, I’ve converted them to Word so that you can more-easily edit them if you want to. The only difference between the two files is that rounded bullets in the pdf file have been converted as square bullets in the Word file.

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Psychology Learning Tables | 4

Thursday, January 25th, 2018

As I dig deeper and find more (and more…) examples of Learning Tables the initial “let’s post them alphabetically for convenience” plan seems both less and more appropriate – the latest batch being a case in point.

As you’ll see, they mainly come under the heading of “Alternative Theories” – which you’ll probably have noticed is alphabetically convenient but not very informative. This means I’ve then had to add a little bit of content explanation to save you having to download each file to see what it contains, which sort-of defeats the objective.

Some you lose and some you lose.

However, you can all be winners (see what I did there?) when you download these Tables (lovingly, I assume, created by various authors, which I’ve named where known).

In the main these Tables all tend to focus on (AO1) skills of knowledge and understanding, although one or two include helpful examples / applications. I’ll leave you to discover which does what. It’ll be our little secret.

As per usual the Tables are all in Word format, which makes it easy to edit them in whatever way you like:

1. Alternative theory: Atypical behaviour – Evolutionary theory (Gemma Ingram)

2. Alternative theory: Criminal Behaviour – Social Learning Theory (Miss K Elles)

3. Alternative theory: The Nativist Theory of Perception (Miss K Elles)

4. Alternative theory: Vygotsky’s Theory of Cognitive Development

5. Alternative theory: Non-Verbal Communication – The Evolutionary Theory (Miss K Elles)

6. Alternative theory: The Self – Eysenck’s Trait Theory (Miss K Elles)

7. Alternative theory: Sex & Gender – Psychodynamic Approach (Miss K Elles)

8. Application: The Self Real Life Application (Sara Callaghan)

9. Application: NVC (Sara Callaghan)

10. Applications of Research into Memory (Miss K Elles)

11. Application: Sex and Gender Research (Miss K Elles)

12. Applications: Research into Atypical Behaviour (Gemma Ingram)

Psychology Learning Tables | 2

Thursday, January 18th, 2018

Convention dictates this second set of Learning Tables, primarily the work of Miss G. Banton (with one notable exception that I’ll explain in a moment) follows the first set of Tables and since this is not a rule I’m overly-inclined to break it’s only seems right-and-proper this should be the case.

These Tables are broadly-designed to cover Knowledge (Assessment Objective 1) and Evaluation (Assessment Objective 3) and while the latter uses relatively simple “for” and “against” arguments, an added dimension is created using a “PEEL” design. This, in case you’re not familiar with the mnemonic has the further advantage of encouraging students to structure exam answers in a specific way.

Without further ado, therefore, the following Tables are available for your downloading pleasure:

Endogenous Pacemakers and Exogenous Zeitgebers AO1 and AO3
Ethical implications of research studies and theory AO1 AND AO3

Free Will vs Determinism AO1 and AO3

Gender Bias AO1 and AO3

Holism and reductionism AO1 and AO3
Humanistic psychology LT

Idiographic and nomothetic approaches AO1 and AO3

Localisation and Function of the brain AO1 and AO3

The final set of Tables, created by Melissa Yeadon, are slightly different in that they’re designed to take the student through the research process – from initial hypothesis to understanding ethical considerations – and involve some student input (mainly in the shape of having to answer questions at various points). In all there are 10 Tables in this set.

Learning Tables Planning Research 

Psychology Learning Tables | 1

Tuesday, January 16th, 2018

As with their sociological counterparts, Psychology Learning Tables come in a variety of styles, have been constructed for a range of different reasons and the ones I’ve scoured the web to find relate to different Specifications and exams. Keep these provisos in mind, however, and you’ll find some of these Tables useful – either “as is” or as inspiration for creating Tables of your own.

Since I’ve managed to find quite a few Tables on different areas of the Specification I thought it would be easier and more-convenient to post the first couple of batches alphabetically.

The Tables have been put-together by different authors at different times and I’ve indicated any significant differences and departures from the basic “Learning Table” format.

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Learning Tables: Education

Thursday, December 21st, 2017

The latest batch of Tables (again created by Miss K Elles and a couple of others) covers some of the main themes in the sociology of education.

The focus is mainly on analysis and evaluation and this set of Tables is particularly text-heavy for some reasons. There’s nary a picture in sight and some Tables run to two or three pages of text.

If you can live with that, the following Tables are available:

Role of Education
Class Differences in Educational Achievement
Gender Differences in Educational Achievement and Subject Choice
Ethnic Differences in Educational Achievement
Selection, Marketisation and Privatisation Policies
Policies for Equal Opportunities (Miss G Banton)
Researching Education (Issac Carter-Bown)

Learning Tables: Beliefs in Society | 2

Tuesday, December 19th, 2017

For this second batch of “Beliefs” Learning Tables the focus is, once again, on religion (although a couple of the Tables cover areas like Science and Ideology if that’s your main area of interest).

The Tables were created by a variety of authors and although the basic principle is the same – present information concisely to cover areas like advantages / disadvantages or analysis and evaluation – the execution is somewhat different and, not to put too fine a point on things, variable.

While the design of some of these Tables is a thing of beauty, others can fairly be described as basic (if we were being kind to “basic”, probably because its nearly Xmas and that’s the sort of generosity one extends this time of year. Apparently).

The other variable dimension – and I’ll leave you to decide about the quality of the specific content – is the amount of information that’s included with each Table: while some authors try to stick rigidly to the “everything condensed onto one page” format, others take a more relaxed view, with content laid-out across 2 or 3 pages. Personally, this doesn’t bother me too much as long as the overall Table design is strong, although if it does bother you I’ve left the files in their original Word format for ease of editing.

This may also be useful if you want to edit the files to remove outdated or irrelevant information (the Tables were probably designed for the AQA Spec. and are a few years old in some instances). You may, therefore, want to remove stuff that’s no-longer useful (or even add bits that are newly-relevant). The same is pertinent if you follow a different Specification – there may be areas you want to edit out or edit in.

Another thing you’ll notice with this batch is that some of the Tables duplicate the previous set of Tables, at least in terms of title, if not necessarily design and content.

On the downside this means having to trawl through two sets of Tables to decide which you – and your students – prefer.

On the upside you’re getting two sets of Tables for the price of none, so a little bit of compare-and-contrast is probably not too high a price to not pay. Or something.

Anyway, I’ve grouped the following Tables by creator rather than topic. Feel free to download them here. Or not, as the case may be:

New Religious Movements (Georgia Banton)
Religion and Social Change (Georgia Banton)
Religion and Social Groups (Georgia Banton)
Types of Religious Organisation (Georgia Banton)

Functionalism 1 (KevII)
Functionalism 2 (KevII)
Marxism / Feminism (KevII)
Marxism (KevII)
Science and Ideology (KevII)
Religion and Science as Belief Systems (KevII)

Types of Religious Organisation (MYeadon)

Feminism (S Zaheer)
Religion in a Global context: Fundamentalism and Globalisation (S Zaheer)

Learning Tables: Beliefs in Society | 1

Monday, December 18th, 2017

For some reason I’ve managed to find rather a lot (20+) of Learning Tables, put together by 5 different authors, on the topic of Beliefs in Society – something that includes both religious beliefs and a range of other types (from politics through to science), although most of the Tables featured here relate to religious beliefs in various ways.

To make things a bit more manageable my end, therefore, I’ve split this post into two: part one presents Tables by what I assume to be a single author (sdale) while the second part (which I’m thinking of calling “part 2” but I’ll need to discuss this further with my agent before making a final decision) contains Tables by a mix of authors.

In this respect the first batch of Tables covers three broad areas:

1. Perspectives on religion (postmodern, neo-marxist etc.)
2. Aspects of religion (such as the relationship to social change)
3. Ideology and belief systems (such as science).

You’ll also find that a couple of the Tables (postmodernism and secularisation) are in two parts with the latter being very similar, for reasons that escape me, but I’m sure you’ll figure it out…

Religion: Key Concepts
Postmodernism 1
Postmodernism 2
Neo-Marxism / Weberian
Social Change
New Religious Movements
Secularisation 1
Secularisation 2
Religion and Social Groups
Science and Ideology

More Learning Tables: AS Research Methods

Saturday, December 16th, 2017

Today’s Table offering is everyone’s favourite revision topic (research methods in case you actually need to ask) and all of the Tables were written / assembled by Miss K Elles, except for those that weren’t.

The Tables cover the major research methods plus a little bit of research methodology (positivism and interpretivism plus stuff on choice of method, value-freedom, objectivity and subjectivity) and mainly focus on knowledge with little bits of application and evaluation thrown-in.

If I had guess – which I do because I don’t know for sure – I’d say these were early-version Tables where the more-complex structure of later Tables hadn’t been established.

Alternatively they may just have been knocked-out quickly to fulfil some necessary teaching and learning void.

Either way, you and your students may find the following Tables useful:

Secondary Sources
Experiments
Surveys
Sampling
Observations
Positivism and Interpretivism 1 (Georgia Banton)
Positivism and Interpretivism 2 (Georgia Banton)
Factors influencing choice of method (Isaac Carter-Bown)
Value-Freedom (S Dale)