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Posts Tagged ‘powerpoint’

Sociological Stories: Broken Windows Revisited

Sunday, September 5th, 2021

This attempt to create something a little different in PowerPoint expands on the first effort by being significantly longer, around 50 slides, split into three separate-but-related sections and dotted with a few choice bits of online video and hyperlinks (for which you will obviously need to be connected to the Internet).

Although it’s made in PowerPoint, it isn’t “A PowerPoint” in the conventional sense of both “sticking bullet points on a page” and being intended for teacher-led instruction.

Rather, it’s more a kiosk-type Presentation designed to be read by individual students as a kind of “sociological story” about Broken Windows. To this end the 3 sections are as follows:

1. Intro and Overview is probably the most-conventional section in terms of A-Level / High School requirements in that it covers a number of the broad strength and weaknesses of Broken Windows.

2. The Ecological Context delves into the theoretical background of Broken Windows in order to examine the claim that we can understand crime and criminality through the lens communal pressures to conform or deviate. As such, it’s a section that students can delve into if they’re particularly interested although, at A / High School level it’s probably not that important. It’s also an area teachers can summarise fairly easily and concisely if needed.

3. The Order Maintenance section deals mainly with Zero-Tolerance Policing and is mainly interesting because of the way it looks at Zimbardo’s “Anonymity of Place” in the light of new research on the experiment. It also introduces an interesting natural experiment recently (2017) carried-out in New York that not only casts grave doubt on the effectiveness of Zero-Tolerance Policing but also tentatively suggests it may be the cause of many of the problems it claims to resolve.

Because the Presentation is made for PowerPoint 2019 / 365 (If you try to load it into previous versions of PowerPoint it will not function as intended) it can only be downloaded in a PowerPoint Show (.ppsx) format. This means it will happily run independently of PowerPoint, whatever – or no – version of PowerPoint you have.

PowerPoint: Defining Mass Media v2

Wednesday, August 4th, 2021

When I posted the previous version of this PowerPoint Presentation I included the rider that I’d have a go at making it “More-Prezi” and “Less-PowerPoint”, by which I meant doing away with the semi-linear structure of the original and replacing it with the kind of open structure characteristic of Prezi Presentations.

This, I’m happy to say, has now been achieved by creating new version of the Defining Mass Media Presentation with a “Main Menu” screen from which you can access all slides in the Presentation at any time and in any order you want.

Defining Mass Media v2

This, as you might expect, has created a new set of navigation problems because the information in the Presentation was designed as a broadly-hierarchical, rather than flat, structure – by which I mean that in terms of the Presentation structure it’s helpful (and possibly essential) to read and understand one thing (the Major Point) before you examine various aspects of it (the Subsidiary Points).

To get around this I’ve made Major Point links larger than their Subsidiary Point links. The initial “Start or Introduction” link is, for example, largest of all and gives you a strong hint about where to begin. I’ve also introduced branches linking everything together. In other words, you have strong clues about where to begin by looking at the overall structure map and seeing which branches lead from what to where.

And if that doesn’t seem totally clear now, once you look at the Start Slide it will become perfectly obvious.

That, among other things, is my promise to you.

As with the previous version, this Presentation is only available as a PowerPoint Show (.ppsx) self-running file. This is because if you try to load a .pptx version into a pre-2019 copy of PowerPoint it will strip-out the Zoom animation function on which everything rests.

And the Presentation will not work as intended.

Which would be a pity (although not a disaster because it may still work after a fashion).

Possibly.

I can’t promise it will so I’d be inclined not to try.

PowerPoint: Defining Mass media

Monday, August 2nd, 2021

If, like me, you’ve always had a sneaking liking for Prezi-style Presentations you’ll probably be aware that the only way to create them was, oddly-enough, by using Prezi.

Defining Mass Media: Prezi-Stylee

Which, in the past wasn’t too much of a problem because you could just use it to create whatever you liked for free.

But that was then.

And this is now.

Which means you’ve only got a couple of choices:

  • Either use the free (and very limited) version that only allows you to make 5 Presentations.
  • Or pay for the “educational version”, which, at £36 a year is quite steep for what you get. And, quite frankly, if you’ve got that kind of money sloshing around in your school / college kitty you could put it to much better use.
  • Or so they would have you believe.

    Because the 2019 version of PowerPoint has a neat little Zoom animation feature that allows you to create “Prezi-style” freeform narrative Presentations without having to shell-out for a Prezi-style subscription.

    Even better, you can pick-up the 2019 Home and Student edition of Microsoft Office (Word, PowerPoint and Excel) for £19.99 if you know where to look – which in this instance is SoftMall UK. You might, if you’re lucky, get stuff like OneNote, Outlook and Publisher thrown-in (although I can’t promise the latter – they were just included in a Microsoft promotion when I bought my copy and that may, or may not, have ended now).

    But back to the point of this post.

    Having (admittedly by accident) discovered the Zoom animation in my shiny new version of PowerPoint I thought I’d try using it to put together a slightly-different, for me at least, style of Presentation: one that focused a bit more on developing a broad narrative structure to a PowerPoint Presentation, as opposed to the more-usual “key point” linear structure I tend to favour.

    Movement around the Presentation is also slightly-unusual. While forward navigation uses (left-click) hyperlinks via the circular, labelled, graphics, you back-out of these by right-clicking. That is, a right mouse click will always take you back one slide.

    Since this is my first attempt it’s not quite there: the Presentation I’ve created (Defining Mass Media if you’re interested) still has a quasi-linear structure that uses a basic menu system (mainly because I decided to include a short video I made a few years back…).

    But it’s a start and I have a few ideas about how to make it “More-Prezi” and “Less-PowerPoint” that I might put into effect at some point if I can be bothered.

    I’ve made the Presentation available as a PowerPoint Show (.ppsx) self-running file because if you have an earlier version of PowerPoint it won’t run as a .pptx file (because these versions don’t have the Zoom animation function).

    Custom Software Guides

    Monday, June 28th, 2021
    PowerPoint 2019

    Custom Guides are free pdf quick reference sheets designed to get you up-and-running quickly and efficiently with a range of Microsoft and Google software (plus one or two others, such as Zoom).

    The currently available Guides cover:

    Microsoft: Access, Excel, Office 365, OneDrive, OneNote, Outlook, PowerPoint, Project, SharePoint, Teams, Windows 10, Word.

    Google: Gmail, Calendar, Chrome, Classroom, Docs, Drive, Forms, Meet, Sheets, Slides.

    Although each Guide is slightly different, depending on the software – some feature Keyboard shortcuts and a section on “Getting Started”, for example – the main focus of each is a range of Topics covering key features of the software.

    While these are all briefly explained in the Guide you can, if necessary, explore them in more detail through the use of links to extended online tutorials that provide detailed walkthroughs of the Topic in question.

    Using PowerPoint Speaker Notes on Zoom

    Saturday, April 10th, 2021
    PowerPoint Presenter View…

    One problem – not admittedly the greatest problem you’re likely to face, but a problem nonetheless – for any teacher who wants to take their students through a PowerPoint Presentation on Zoom is the fact students see on their screens exactly what the teacher sees.

    And while you can use PowerPoint’s Presenter View to hide all the general background stuff that goes into creating your Presentation you don’t particularly want your audience to see, Presenter View on Zoom also hides this from you.

    So, if you’re using Speaker Notes to walk students through each slide you need to have them prepared separately from the Presentation because otherwise you won’t be able to see them.

    And that’s not ideal.

    Similarly, Presenter View on a single monitor doesn’t allow you see the next slide in a Presentation so you need to be very familiar with the slides you’re presenting in order to ensure you maintain the fiction you know exactly what you’re doing.

    Or something.

    If you want to resolve this problem, it’s not difficult and this video will walk you through the process.

    The Impact of Social Media

    Monday, February 15th, 2021
    Student Pack…

    This set of free resources is the outcome of a collaboration between the Hong Kong University Department of Sociology (who may just take the prize for “Worst Designed Home Page. Ever”. Take a look, if you dare and tell me it doesn’t make you feel queasy) and the UK’s Very Own OCR Exam Board.

    Aesthetics aside, what’s on offer from this collaboration is a set of free teaching resources focused on the sociology of social media, the most-immediately useful of which, for UK-based teachers, are likely to be the Teacher (available as pdf or docx files) and Student Packs (similarly available in pdf or docx format).

    UK OCR Resources

    The Teacher Pack offers an overview of the resources in terms of things like the aims and objectives of the Project, how the materials link to the OCR Specification and suggested ways to use the resources) while the Student Pack provides a range of questions and activities, many of which are linked to the University of London’s “Why We Post” research on the uses and consequences of social media. 

    PowerPoint Presentation…

    The third element to the resource is an extensive (44-slide) PowerPoint Presentation containing a whole host of interesting information, videos and activities based around the notion of “Seeing society through social media”.

    While the Packs and Presentations are all (obviously) focused on the OCR Spec. there’s plenty here for teachers of other Specs. to use, either “as is” or with a bit of judicious tweaking to fit them to the requirements of the course you’re teaching.

    HKDSE Liberal Studies Resources

    There are further resources available to support the HKDSE Liberal Studies course, focused around the idea of “Conducting Independent Enquiry About Social Media”. While the general focus of these resources – students producing “a report of not more than 4,500 words” (something that gives me a flashback to the old OCR Research Report) – is no-longer applicable to UK Specs (more’s the pity…) there are still some useful resources on Research Methods (operationalising concepts, choosing a research method, quantitative and qualitative data…) that might be worth a gander to see what might be usefully cannibalised.

    HKDSE Resources

    PowerPoint Lessons: Sociology

    Tuesday, February 2nd, 2021

    I chanced upon this series of “PowerPoint Lessons” from Eggbuckland Community College while looking for Knowledge Organisers (as you do) – and while the promised Organiser has either disappeared or was never posted the page contains a load of useful resources for those teaching Crime, Health, Media, and Research Methods (a rare outing for the Oxford Comma, in case you’re interested and, quite coincidentally an opportunity to create a tangential link to one of my favourite tunes…).

    These take the form of the aforementioned PowerPoint Lessons – sets of PowerPoint slides organised into topics that follow the (AQA) Spec. Crime and Deviance, for example, has 15 Lessons covering things like perspectives (Functionalism, Marxism, Interactionist), prevention, corporate and environmental crime, gender, ethnicity and a great deal more.

    The Lessons themselves generally consist of slides designed to encourage class discussions / research around specific ideas and topics – there’s a liberal sprinkling of questions and activities within each topic – rather than simple didacticism (although, having said that, some of the slides are explicitly designed to impart specific ideas and information).

    In general terms, therefore, I’d tend to see the Lessons as broadly indicative of the kinds of areas and information to cover on a particular topic rather than necessarily providing that information.

    This, of course, is No Bad Thing because it allows teachers working in different schools to add their own materials to the Lessons – one of the advantages of using something like PowerPoint is the ease with which it allows this to happen.

    Judging by the changing templates used these resources seem to have evolved over a period of years (the earliest seems to date from 2014), with their appearance becoming progressively more professional over time.

    The latest lessons on Research Methods, for example, look particularly attractive, even though this section is somewhat incomplete when compared to the Crime, Health and Media sections: currently (2021) there’s only coverage of three areas (Choosing a Method, Experiments and Questionnaires) – although it may, of course, just be the case that no-ones got around to adding further lessons yet.

    To round things off there are a few further resources on offer, such as guidance on how to approach different-mark exam questions (very useful) and a Revision Checklist and Health Mind Map that isn’t (not useful).

    Study Skills Resources

    Tuesday, November 3rd, 2020

    The Welsh Exam Board site seems to have undergone a rather drastic culling of it’s once-outstanding sociology resources – all I could find was a rather sad Flash movie on gender socialisation that will cease to function on January 1st 2021, some interesting and extensive Crime and Deviance resources that are definitely worth digging around and a Research Methods section that’s quite substantial, looks very nice in all its html5 glory but which, when all’s-said-and-done, doesn’t actually offer very much more than you’d find on the (static) pages of a textbook.

    A Functional PowerPoint

    There is, however, an interesting Study Skills section – a mix of Word and PowerPoint documents – that seems to have survived and even though most of the documents were created a good few years ago (and then some – although we are at least talking 21st century) there’s no reason why some – or indeed all – couldn’t happily find a place in your teaching.

    The materials broadly cover things like essay-writing, evaluation and revision and while they’re clearly aimed at WJEC students they’re generic enough to apply to other exam boards.

    Although the materials are fairly basic in terms of presentation (and occasionally weirdly-strident in tone – the Guide to Revision reads like it was written by a teacher who was particularly frustrated by their students inability to follow simple instructions and is writing on the verge of some sort of apoplectic explosion…) but they’re generally functional enough and the PowerPoint’s in particular are informative and helpful.

    Gamified Homework: Climb Every Mountain

    Tuesday, September 29th, 2020

    This second example of gamification takes a slightly different and less organisationally-complex approach to setting homework than its Earn-to-Learn predecessor.

    Click to download Game Board
    Families and Households game board

    It does this by adopting the mechanics of a game board: all students start at the same point and work their way to the top (or end-point) by traversing different levels. In this particular example I’ve created three levels, but there’s no reason why you can’t extend this to add more levels if required.

    To understand how the gamified design works, have a look at the PowerPoint Board file:

    1. The first level of the Board contains a set of relatively low-mark questions. Students can select as many as they like to complete for homework, with the objective being to “escape the level” by matching or exceeding a pre-specified “level mark”. In the example I’ve provided students need to score 15+ marks to go to the next level but this can, of course, be adjusted to whatever score you like.

    A student could, for example, select a couple of higher mark questions (10 and 6) to complete. If they score full-marks they complete the level. If, on the other hand, they score 12 marks they would need to complete further homework questions in order to successfully complete the level.

    2. Once a student has achieved the requirements for level 3 they have completed that set of homework tasks. If you want to extended individual students further you can, if you wish, set “advanced levels” for them to complete.

    I’ve provided the “Families and Households” question Board as a PowerPoint file to make it easy for you to tweak and edit it to suit your own particular course.

    Variations

    Click to download blank game board.
    Blank Game Board

    A variation you may want to consider is that instead of putting homework questions directly on the Board you simply indicate the marks available for each “question square”, as in this blank game board.

    When a student chooses, say, a 10-mark question you can give them a prepared question that corresponds to the mark box they’ve chosen. Alternatively, as with Earn-to-Learn, you could have a prepared list of 2 / 6 / 10 mark questions and students can select the ones they want to do from the list.

    This variation means that you don’t have to physically add questions to the game board, which makes it easy to reuse for other topics. All you may need to do is adjust the marks for each question box, depending on the topic being covered.

    The Crime Collection

    Tuesday, September 15th, 2020

    In a previous post I pulled-together all the free crime and deviance films we have available to create a simple one-stop-shop (so to speak) you could browse, rather than have to search individually for these films.

    I’ve extended this thinking to bring together all the posts we’ve made on Crime and Deviance – and since there’s “quite a few” I thought it might be useful to break them down into rough categories (Notes, Organisers, Activities, PowerPoints and Films) for your viewing convenience.

    Since I’ve discovered this is actually quite a task, I’ll add the different categories “as-and-when” I can, starting with:

    (more…)

    GCSE Sociology Freebies

    Wednesday, July 8th, 2020

    The Sociology Support web site has some new and interesting freebies available for GCSE Sociology, the first of which is the Spec Check Pack.

    This consists of neat, one-page, summaries of the AQA Specification content (including an indication of Key Studies) that students (and teachers…) should find useful for both tracking progress through the course and for revision.

    The Pack has four pdf documents covering Social Stratification, Education, Family and Deviance.

    It might also be worth your while picking-up their free “Introducing Structural Theories” resource, again for AQA GCSE, that’s described as:

    A lesson for GCSE Sociology students introducing the main principles of structural perspectives”.

    This can be downloaded as both a PowerPoint Presentation and pdf file.

    As if that’s not enough, there’s also a free CPD “Introduction to teaching excellent sociology for non-specialists” Webinar on Thursday 27th August 4:45-5:45pm.

    You’ll find registration details on the web site (plus details of their new online CPD courses if you’re interested).

    Education Workbooks

    Monday, May 25th, 2020

    This set of resources, created by Lizzie Read, covers different aspects of Education across three main categories:

    1. The Role of Education is a 50-page+ resource that includes a Teacher version and a Student version.

    2. Differential Achievement is split into two sub-categories: Class and Gender (with a Teacher version and a Student version) and Ethnicity – also with a Teacher version and a Student version.

    3. Changes in UK Education looks at some changes since 1988 – particularly in relation to types of school – and has both a Teacher version and a Student version.

    As with the first set on Families and Households, these resources were originally distributed as PowerPoint Presentations and I’ve converted them to Pdf files in case you want to use them as Workbooks.

    The files also contain occasional references to particular “textbook pages” that you might want to update, if you follow the OCR Specification, or change / remove if you follow some other Specification. You can do this by editing the following PowerPoint versions of the files (and optionally saving them as Pdf files):

    1. The Role of Education: Teacher PowerPoint | Student PowerPoint

    2. Differential Achievement:

    Class and Gender: Teacher PowerPoint | Student PowerPoint

    Ethnicity: Teacher PowerPoint | Student PowerPoint

    3. Changes in UK Education: Teacher PowerPoint | Student PowerPoint

    Family and Household Workbooks

    Sunday, May 24th, 2020

    These resources were originally created and distributed as PowerPoints by Lizzie Read, but I’ve converted them to Pdf files. This format gives them a “Workbook” feel that, I think, works much more effectively if you want your students to work through the materials, either as an “online lockdown resource” or, when you’re able to get back into the classroom, as a general study resource.

    The materials cover two broad aspects of the Family Spec.:

    1. Diversity: There are two packs available, one for Teachers and one for Students.

    They are basically the same with a few additions to the Teacher Pack:

  • It’s split into four discrete “Lessons” for ease of teaching.
  • It contains suggested answers to all the student activities (which may save you a little time).
  • It signposts some “Learning Objectives”, along the lines of what all students should be able to do, what most are expected to do and what some are capable of doing. How useful you find these probably depends on if or how you use learning objectives in your teaching.
  • (more…)

    Cherry-Picking Revision

    Thursday, May 21st, 2020

    Cherry-Picking Revision is a simple Presentation based on an original idea by History-teacher James Fitzgibbon. While the basic idea is much the same as his – getting students to identify key ideas they can “cherry-pick” to answer exam-type questions – I’ve converted it to PowerPoint and extended it slightly:

    Cherry-Picking Answers…

    1. To make it a little more interactive.

    2. To provide a range of different “revision options” to use with students.

    3. To potentially cover a wider range of questions, from simple 2-markers to essay-type.

    As you’ll see, once you fire it up, there are now 3 different types of resource contained within the Presentation. While these are all minor variations on the same basic theme, they provide a few different options for any revision exercise, depending on what you’re trying to do with your students:

    Pick-Your-Own: Students select options from a range of ideas to answer a question.

    Cherry-Picking: This has 3 different sub-options you can use it to get students to answer a wide range of questions.

    Pick-The-Best: Students are presented with 7 possible ideas they can use to answer a question, from which they need to pick 2, 3 or 4, depending on the type of question asked, but some are red-herrings they will find difficult, if not impossible, to apply.

    Finally, since the Presentation only provides a single sample question to familiarise you with its mechanics, I’ve provided a Template slide you can use to devise and implement any question(s) you want to use. I’ve tried to make it as simple as possible to create new questions and answers, particularly if you’re not familiar with the creation of slightly more-complicated forms of slide interaction.

    I’ve also included reasonably extensive Notes under each slide to explain the basic purpose of each type in the Presentation.

    Has the position of children within the family and society changed?

    Wednesday, February 12th, 2020
    Changing Childhood?
Click to download PowerPoint presentation.

    Following from – and in some ways complementing – the Family and Household Revision Guide I posted yesterday comes this Childhood PowerPoint Presentation, authored by Lisa Wrigglesworth, that provides an overview of some of the key ideas and concepts in the sociology of childhood. These include:

  • march of progress thesis
  • child-centred families
  • toxic childhood
  • conflict: inequality and control
  • age patriarchy
  • the new sociology of childhood.
  • The objective is to examine the question of whether or not the position of children within the family and society has changed and, if so, to what extent?

    Although the Presentation was created in 2017 a lot of the references are slightly-dated – and while this doesn’t invalidate the observations made you might want to add one or two more contemporary pieces of research to bring things up-to-date.

    Sociological Detectives: An End Has A Start

    Sunday, October 13th, 2019

    This is a simple, counter-intuitive, teaching technique that can be used to enliven run-of-the-mill lessons (or serve as a quick’n’dirty lesson template when the inspiration for all-singing, all-dancing lessons has temporarily left the room) by reversing the teaching process: instead of starting-at-the-start and gradually revealing more and more information to students, you begin-at-the-end and encourage them to “build backwards” to create an understanding of The Bigger Picture (whatever it was you need them to grasp).

    And if this all sounds a little complicated, an example should clarify things.

    Starting at the Start…

    A conventional way to teach a high-level concept such as “Functionalism” might be to start-at-the-start by identifying a number of key ideas –

  • Organismic analogy
  • Consensus
  • Function
  • Purpose and Needs
  • Social system
  • – and then explaining, illustrating and applying each as necessary to provide a broad overview of this general perspective.

    At various points in the process students can be asked to make contributions, such as answering a question or providing an example, but it can be very easy for them to be relatively passive observers and recorders of your teaching.

    If you want to make your students do a bit more of the work – and who, quite frankly, doesn’t? – there’s a simple way to do this: one that doesn’t involve a lot of additional pre-preparation, gets your students actively involved in their own learning and is the kind of simple lesson template you can reuse as much as you like.

    Because although the process is always the same, outcomes will always be different.

    And rather than just telling students something, you structure your teaching to lead them to discover it for themselves – which sounds as though it might be complicated and involve a great deal of work on your part, but really doesn’t.

    How you achieve all this is, like all good ideas, deceptively simple.

    Continue On To An End Has A Start…

    Introducing Sociology: Core Concepts

    Tuesday, September 10th, 2019
    Culture Presentation

    Core Concepts in Sociology was a series of short films on areas like culture, identity and socialisation produced by OnlineClassroom. If you’re interested, the films are still available in various places but since they were originally published in 2007(ish) the technical quality is probably not up to the standards to which we’re now accustomed.

    The content, however, is still sound.

    Which is probably just as well because I’ve managed to dig-out the resources we created at the time to accompany the film. They’re perfectly serviceable, if a little basic…

    The main resources were three PowerPoint Presentations covering:

    1. Culture

    2. Identity

    3. Socialisation

    Although they were originally designed to complement teaching in conjunction with the films there’s nothing here that actually requires students to have watched the films.

    more resources…

    Agencies of Socialisation

    Tuesday, September 3rd, 2019
    Agencies of Socialisation PowerPoint: Click to download.
    Before…

    Another day, another PowerPoint Presentation.

    And this time its “All About The Agencies”

    The Presentation identifies a range of primary and secondary socialising agencies (family, peers, education, workplace, media and religion to be precise) and provides some simple information / examples for each in five categories:

  • Behaviour
  • Roles
  • Norms
  • Values
  • Sanctions.
  • If this sounds a bit complicated, it’s really not.

    The complicated bit was designing and compiling the slides, but since you’re unlikely to be very interested in the trials and tribulations involved in creating a monstrous, vaguely-interactive, PowerPoint Presentation with sliding menu, it’s probably best to move on.

    There’s more if you want it…

    Types Of Cybercrime

    Tuesday, August 20th, 2019

    Cybercrime, broadly defined as unlawful behaviour involving the use of computers – either as a tool for committing a crime (such as cyber stalking) or as the target of a crime (such as identity theft) – comes in a number of shapes and disguises and this “reasonably short” (i.e. quite long) PowerPoint Presentation can be used to introduce some of the main types.

    These include, in no particular order:

    Types of Cybercrime PowerPoint: click to download
    Types of Cybercrime
  • Hacking
  • Viruses
  • DDoS Attacks
  • Phishing
  • Spamming
  • Jacking
  • Cyber Stalking
  • Identity Theft
  • Slicing
  • IP Theft
  • As you may have noticed these types all involve, to greater or lesser extents, access to a networked system of computers – hence the idea of cybercrime: “crime that takes place in cyberspace”: pretty much a defining feature of contemporary computer crime.

    Read more stuff about the presentation

    Graphic Organiser: Compare and Contrast

    Monday, March 4th, 2019
    The Classic Venn Diagram

    The latest post in the series devoted to graphic organisers sees the long-overdue introduction of the Venn diagram – a classic form of graphic organiser that provides a simple, visual, way to compare and contrast two (or sometimes more) ideas.

    It’s a type that works well with something like sociological perspectives where students are frequently required to look at the similarities (compare) and differences (contrast) between perspectives like Functionalism or Marxism.

    Equally, it’s possible to apply compare and contrast techniques within perspectives – examining different types of Feminism, for example, or comparing traditional forms of Functionalism and Marxism with their more-contemporary forms.

    This PowerPoint Presentation contains two organiser examples:

    1. The conventional circular Venn diagram.

    2. A less-conventional squared version.

    While both designs serve exactly the same functional purpose, the squared version provides more writing space – something that may be useful where there are a large number of differences / similarities to identify.

    Graphic Organisers: The 5 Points of the Star

    Wednesday, February 27th, 2019
    The 5 Points of…

    A previous post outlined the basic ideas underpinning the graphic organiser, introduced an example of the genre (the Frayer Model) and teased the possibility of further examples of ready-made organiser templates (as opposed to the more free-form examples you can find in the Revision section here).

    So, in the spirit of actually trying to deliver what may or may not have been promised (about which I can unfortunately make no further promises) I thought I’d start with what I consider one of the most potentially-useful: the “5-Point Star” template.

    And when I say “start” I’m suggesting there will be more examples to follow.

    Which indeed there may well be.

    I’ll see what I can do.

    (more…)

    Methods Mat

    Monday, January 14th, 2019
    Methods Mat

    A generic Methods Mat template that might be useful for both Sociology and Psychology A-level Research methods teaching. 

    The Research Methods Tables created by Liam Core got me thinking about how to present a similar level of information in a Learning Mat format (such as Stacey Arkwright’s Sociology Mats, the Psychology Studies Mat or the generic Sociology / Psychology Mat).

    What I’ve come up with is Learning Mat template – an A4 page available as either a PowerPoint or Pdf document – focused on a single research method. I’ve included the PowerPoint version for a couple of reasons:

    Firstly, if you’re in the habit of displaying stuff for your students it’s much easier to do this in PowerPoint.

    Secondly, if you want to edit the template – to create, for example, a worked illustration – it’s a lot less work to do it in PowerPoint.

    Although the Mat should be fairly straightforward to use (it includes space to note the Key Features, Strengths and Weaknesses of a Research Method) I’ve added / adapted a couple of sections from the original:

    The first is fairly minor: the addition of a way to indicate if it’s a primary or secondary research method).

    (more…)

    Crime and Deviance Theories

    Wednesday, October 31st, 2018

    A little while back (maybe 5 or 6 years ago – I lose track) I created 3 Crime and Deviance Presentations that were, I like to think, quite ground-breaking at the time for their combination of text, graphics, audio and video – and while they may be looking a little dated now they still have a little mileage left in them. Probably. You can be the judge of that, I suppose.

    Anyway, I think I only ever posted an early version of the Functionalism file and having rediscovered the files on one of my many hard drives I thought it might be nice to update the files slightly, mainly to fix a few little irritating bugettes, such as text not conforming correctly to the original font size and post them here.

    The Presentations, which can be downloaded as PowerPoint Shows (.ppsx) in case you want to use them without the need to have PowerPoint, were, I think, originally designed as some sort of revision exercise, but I could be, and frequently am, wrong.

    (more…)

    Sociology and You: Supporting Materials

    Saturday, May 5th, 2018

    The original publishers of Sociology and You (Glencoe) made a bit of an effort to produce branded PowerPoint resources to accompany each chapter and while there’s nothing very special about them – they’re pretty much bog-standard “text on a white background” slides – these ready-made resources can be useful as a way of introducing key ideas, concepts and theories to students. In the main they take the format of a chapter preview, key terms with short definitions and some expanded text that variously includes discussion and / or simple multiple choice questions.

    If you just want these resources, they are the first link under each chapter heading but I’ve also included further PowerPoint resources created by various teachers (check the metadata if you want to know who) that seem to reference, directly or indirectly, this particular textbook.

    (more…)

    A-Level Sociology Revision: 7. Families and Households

    Thursday, April 19th, 2018

    As with some of the other topics, revision materials for family life are both a bit scarce and a little bit dated, in the sense that where the UK Specs. have recently changed, older revision guides obviously don’t cover the newer additions.

    On the other hand, there’s still a strong continuity between the older and newer Specs. (some ideas never grow old – looking at you “1950’s Functionalism and the Family”) so as long as you keep this in mind the various Notes on offer here may prove useful. You also need to note that most of the materials here refer to the AQA Specification, so if you’re following a different Spec. you need to check which areas are – and are not – applicable. There are probably few things worse than getting into an exam room to find that you’ve revised the wrong Specification (this, of course, is a lie. There are a lot worse things).

    Also.

    If you find yourself in the position of not knowing which Specification you’ve been studying for the past two years then either your teacher has seriously given-up on you or you’ve been mistakenly following the wrong course (Psychology was in Room 101…).

    Either way, these Notes aren’t going to help you.

    For those of you not in this unhappy situation you should find stuff to aid your revision (particularly if, for whatever reason, you’ve got gaps in your revision notes). I’ve also added a couple of PowerPoints and some Mindmaps to the list, both because I think the latter, in particular, can be a good revision resource and also because I can.

    1. Family and Households Revision Booklet (John Williams)
    2. Families and Households Revision Guide 2011
    3. Families and Households Revision Pack 2016 (S Hickman)
    4. Revision Notes

    5. Family Revision PowerPoint
    6. The Sociology of the Family PowerPoint (L Ricker)

    7. Mindmaps: Feminism | Functionalism | Marxism | Family and Personal Life
    8. Spider Diagrams

    Culture and Identity PowerPoints

    Wednesday, April 18th, 2018

    To complement the Culture and Identity Revision booklets I’ve assembled a range of PowerPoint Presentations from a variety of sources including some nice little presentations put together by the OCR Exam Board (with accompanying Instruction and Activity booklets).

    While the Presentations are probably more-suited to integration into an Introductory Sociology / Culture and Identity teaching session (the Presentations cover areas like culture, socialisation, identity, perspectives and the like), some may have value as a revision tool.

    As ever, the Presentations vary in size, complexity and competence (although I’ve tried to weed-out Presentations I didn’t think added much value or which weren’t sufficiently focused on A-Level Sociology). Where known I’ve indicated the author of each Presentation, to whom you should direct any plaudits, questions or brickbats.

    1. Culture and Identity (Steven Humphreys)
    2. Introductory Concepts (Mark Gill)
    3. Social and Personal Identities (Leigh Rust-Ashford)
    4. Culture
    5. Socialisation
    6. Feminism and Patriarchy (Chris Deakin)
    7. Class identity (Liz Voges)
    8. Primary and Secondary Socialisation
    9. Socialisation and Resocialisation (Gobind Khalsa)
    10. Class, Gender, Ethnicity (Mark Gill)
    11. Social Control (Leigh Rust-Ashford)
    12. Culture and Social Identity (Joe McVeigh)
    13. Elements of Culture (Rebekah Colbeth)
    14. Identity and Hybrid Identities (OCR) | Teacher Instructions | Activity Booklet
    15. Culture and Cultural Identity (Jane Lister Reis)
    16. Sport and National Identity
    17. Culture, Values and Norms (OCR) | Teacher Instructions | Activity Booklet 
    18. Culture and Cultural Hybridity (OCR) | Teacher Instructions | Activity Booklet

    Education PowerPoints: Part 2

    Wednesday, April 11th, 2018

    Part 2 of the Education Presentations gives you more of the same, only less of it.

    More PowerPoints, in other words, but fewer of them than in Part 1.

    Most of these are fairly straightforward “Teaching Presentations” but some contain YouTube videos (again, I’ve converted the links so they will play directly inside the Presentation) and one, the Social Class revision exercise, is a simple “sift-and-sort” activity designed to help students clarify “inside” and “outside” school factors in class differential achievement.

    The Presentations, in no particular order:

    1. Marketisation (Leigh Rust-Ashford)
    2. Social Class – revision exercise
    3. Ethnicity and Achievement (Leigh Rust-Ashford)
    4. Material Deprivation (Leigh Rust-Ashford)
    5. Anti-School Subcultures (Leigh Rust-Ashford)
    6. Feminist / Postmodernist Perspectives (Leigh Rust-Ashford)
    7. The Purpose of Education

    Education PowerPoints: Part 1

    Tuesday, April 10th, 2018

    Alongside the Revision Guides I seem to have collected a large number of Education PowerPoints that, while not explicitly geared towards revision, could be used in this way. Alternatively, they could just be used as part of your normal classroom teaching.

    The Presentations are by a mix of authors (where known) but the majority are by Leigh Rust-Ashford, so they have the same “look and feel” and follow a similar format – clear teaching points, a few questions and simple exercises, a couple of illustrative YouTube videos (the only changes I’ve made to the files, apart from deleting dead links, is to format the video links so they use the PowerPoint video player) and so forth.

    I’ve split the Presentations into two parts, in no particular order:

    1. Meritocracy
    2. Functionalism (Leigh Rust-Ashford)
    3. Interactionism (Leigh Rust-Ashford)
    4. Organisation of Education
    5. Postmodernism (N Sharmin)
    6. Working Class Culture and Achievement (Leigh Rust-Ashford)
    7. Locality and Achievement (Leigh Rust-Ashford)
    8. Gender and Achievement (Leigh Rust-Ashford)
    9. Class and Achievement (Leigh Rust-Ashford)
    10. Postmodern education (Leigh Rust-Ashford)
    11. Marxism (Leigh Rust-Ashford)

    Office Online: For Free (and Quite Legal)

    Thursday, March 29th, 2018

    The free version of Microsoft’s Office Suite may have a reduced functionality when compared to the desktop version but for “no money” it has to be a bit of a bargain for both teachers and students.

    While applications like Word and PowerPoint are probably staples of any teaching toolkit, they can be expensive, even when you take into account the various “Teachers and Students” discount versions of the Office Suite currently available: “Office Home & Student 2016 for PC”,
    for example, can set you back around £90 for access to just 4 programs (Word, PowerPoint, OneNote and Excel).

    For a-level students this cost can be prohibitive, which may go some way to explaining the plethora of cheap “Word” clones on the market and the popularity of free online apps like Google Docs.

    Another problem if, like me, you prefer to use desktop versions of these apps, is their lack of portability. If you want to move your work freely and easily across different platforms it’s a real pain because you don’t have access to online versions of programs like Word or PowerPoint.

    Microsoft’s “solution” is Office 365 – the online version of their Office Suite. Once again, however, this is expensive. Office 365 Home will set you back around £80 per year for the privilege of access to the above four apps plus:

    • Publisher (Microsoft’s expensive, Very Ordinary and Just-A-Little-Bit-Clunky DTP).
    • Outlook (an email client that has better and cheaper (i.e. free) competitors such as Mozilla Thunderbird) and
    • Access (a very good database but, be honest, how often do you use a database in your everyday teaching / learning?). (more…)

    Psychology Studies Mat

    Monday, March 26th, 2018

    Neat Notes!

    The idea for Psychology Study Mats came to me while idly browsing Pinterest and chancing upon Emily’s blog.

    I was initially struck by what may well prove to be some of the neatest and well-organised Psychology Notes I’ve ever seen and while exploring further I came across an interesting idea in the Printables section: a Study Template students use to summarise the studies they need to know in detail.

    The Template, however, is in pdf format and I guess the basic idea is to print the file (hence Printables – very little gets past me) and complete it by hand. Alternatively, it’s possible to enter text directly into the Template using something like the Acrobat Reader, but personally I find this a clunky method, particularly if there’s a lot of text to position and enter.

    So, while the basic structure and content seemed sound, I thought I might be able to add something to the Template by adapting it slightly to fit it the format I used for the PowerPoint-based Sociology Learning Mats I’d previously developed: (more…)

    Sociology Revision PowerPoints: Crime and Deviance

    Saturday, March 24th, 2018

    The second part of the Crime and Deviance Revision series (the first, if you missed it,  involves revision booklets) is devoted to a range of PowerPoint Presentations that I’ve collected from various places. Just have a look at the document properties if you want to know who created them.

    The quality of the Presentations is “variable” at times so it’s probably a case of having a look at any that take your fancy to see if they’re something you can use. You also need to keep in mind the date when some of these were created (again, just check the document properties).

    Although most of the Presentations are just a relatively simple mix of text and graphics, some include links to YouTube videos (which you can, of course, edit accordingly if you want) and some are a little more interactive in terms of their content (posing questions, setting short exercises and the like).

    Although I’ve signposted the Presentations as a revision resource there’s no reason why you couldn’t incorporate some of these into your everyday teaching if you like to use PowerPoint. They can, of course, be edited to your particular requirements.

    The Presentations (all 26 of them…) are as follows:

    (more…)

    Learning Mats: A Generic Version

    Tuesday, February 27th, 2018

    The Learning Maps we’ve previously posted have rightly proven popular, both because of their quality and because they meet a need for tools that help students to structure their work in a simple and effective way – one that has the added bonus of providing a tightly-organised and highly visual method of revision.

    Good as they are – and I’d certainly recommend downloading them to see how they meet your teaching needs – they’re generally designed for a specific (AQA) Specification and while they can be edited to meet the requirements of different Specifications, students and teachers, this involves time and effort that might not always be readily available.

    This led me to wonder about creating a generic “one-size-fits-all” version of the Mats – one that involved teachers doing absolutely no work whatsoever in terms of creating Mats that could be used in a variety of situations and ways across a range of different Specifications.

    What I’ve tried to do in this Mat Template, therefore, is focus on what I think are the key elements students would need to cover for a good knowledge and understanding of a concept, theory or method (although, to be honest, I’m not sure about how well the version I’ve designed would work with the latter). In basic terms, this might involve:

    • Describing a concept / theory / method.
    • Identifying its key proponents, critics and studies.
    • Identifying its strengths and weaknesses.

    (more…)

    Yet More Sociology Knowledge Organisers

    Thursday, February 15th, 2018

    The Learning Tables and Knowledge Organisers we’ve recently posted were all for the AQA Specification and while there’s a good deal of crossover between this Specification and OCR I thought it would be helpful to those following the latter if they had some KO’s to call their own.

    These Organisers, all produced by Lucy Cluley, are, however, slightly different in that while some – mainly those for Research Methods – are complete, the remainder are blank templates. That is, while the author has designed various categories in areas like Crime Reduction Techniques or Research Methods, the actual content is up to you – and / or your students – to create.

    While this has an obvious downside (someone else hasn’t done the work…) it does open-up interesting possibilities for revision work with your students, either individually or as a whole class.

    In relation to the latter you’ll note that most of the blank templates are in PowerPoint (PP) format but if you want to use them with individual students simply use the PowerPoint Export function to save them as pdf files.

    (more…)

    Crime and Deviance: Non-Sociological vs Labelling Approaches

    Thursday, December 28th, 2017

    I came across this “Approaches to Crime and Deviance” PowerPoint the other day while searching through an old hard drive (the metadata says I created it in 2003 and although that sounds about right in terms of the look-and-feel of the Presentation it may actually have been created a little later, not that this makes much difference to anything) and thought it might be interesting to show it the light of day in case anyone finds it useful.

    In this respect it’s basically a 3-screen presentation that looks at:

    1. Non-sociological approaches using a “6 things you might need to know” format.

    2. Labelling approaches using a similar format.

    3. Understanding crime and deviance as relative concepts by asking students to find examples of the same behaviour considered as deviant / non-deviant at different times (historical dimension) and places (cross-cultural dimension).

    I’m guessing it was originally intended to be an Introductory presentation of some description, possibly for the old OCR Specification that required students to look at both sociological and non-sociological approaches.

    If you don’t need to consider non-sociological approaches you can still use the presentation as both an Introduction to Labelling and as a starter activity designed to get students thinking about crime and deviance as relative concepts through the use of simple comparative examples.

    Crime and Criminology PowerPoint 3

    Tuesday, August 22nd, 2017

    The third WJEC Criminology offering – again I’m thinking it’s by Janis Griffiths – focuses on Sociological theories of criminality and serves as a brief introduction to:

    • Marxism,
    • Functionalism,
    • Interactionism and
    • Realism.

    The main content here is basically a one-screen summary of key points so it’s probably best seen as a launching-point for further research and discussion than an end in itself.

    There are a couple of interactive slides (match the statement to the perspective, for example), class discussion questions, suggestions for personal research and the feature I find most-interesting about all the Presentations I’ve featured, “the scenario situation”.

    Here, students are presented with a basic scenario – in this instance an Asian-owned shop under attack by local youths – and students are required to examine and explain the scenario from the viewpoint of one or more different sociological approaches / theories.

    I think it’s probably fair to say that I like this idea so much I’m prepared, at some point when I get a bit of time, to create scenarios of my own and then pass the idea off as one I may have invented…

    Categorising SCP: Techniques and Examples

    Saturday, June 3rd, 2017

    The first post in this short series outlined what Cornish and Clarke (2003) called 5 Situational Crime Prevention strategies and this PowerPoint Presentation develops this to include what they argued were “25 crime prevention techniques” associated with these strategies. In the presentation each technique is both briefly explained and illustrated.

    This material is presented as a PowerPoint because this format allows you to control how much – or how little – information to give your students.

    It may be that for some purposes it’s enough for students just to understand that grouping Situational Crime Prevention into 5 broad strategy categories (from Increasing the Effort to Reducing the Reward) will help them organise their thoughts about this general area.

    For others it might be helpful to illustrate each strategy with 5 crime prevention techniques and, if necessary, further illustrate each technique with examples.

    Deviancy Amplification PowerPoint

    Thursday, May 4th, 2017

    Deviancy Amplification has become something of a classic example of an Interactionist approach to deviance, predominantly, but not exclusively, because of Jock Young’s seminal analysis (1971) of “The role of the police as amplifiers of deviance, negotiators of reality and translators of fantasy”.

    This is a little ironic given that Leslie Wilkins’ original formulation of an Amplification Spiral (1964) has much more positivistic overtones: for Wilkins, the Spiral (or “Positive Feedback Loop”) both described a particular social process – how control agencies unwittingly create crime through their unwitting actions – and, most importantly, was intended to predict how such behaviour would develop.

    While the predictive element is perhaps long-gone (if it actually ever really existed) deviancy amplification remains an important sociological model based on Lemert’s (1951) distinction between primary and secondary deviation.

    (more…)

    Interpretivism: Emergent (Exploratory) Research

    Friday, March 17th, 2017

    Although the Hypothetico-deductive model describes an important way of doing research, by way of contrast (since not all sociologists believe the same things or do things in exactly the same way) we can look at an alternative “emergent (exploratory) research” model that can be closely associated with Interpretivist methodology.

    In general, this type of model follows the same basic flow identified by Oberg (1999) – albeit with some significant design modifications – in that it involves:

    1. Planning:

    A research issue is identified and a “research question” or “problem” takes shape. This may flow from background reading on the topic or the researcher may want to “come fresh” to the research to avoid being influenced by what others have said or written.

    (more…)

    The Crime and Deviance Channel

    Monday, April 18th, 2016

    Tcche Channel is a collection of original resources – Text, PowerPoint, Audio and Video – designed to complement the teaching of crime and deviance.

    It’s been running since 2010 and we’ve recently decided to give it a complete redesign, partly because the old design was getting a bit long-in-the-tooth and partly because hardware and browser development has moved-on over the past few years.

    The Channel gives students and teachers access to:

    • around 150 minutes of video resources.

    • around 70 minutes of podcasts.

    • 23 different Text resources, including book chapters and update materials.

    • 28 PowerPoint slides and presentations.

    If you want to check-out the type of resources on offer the Channel Home Page has links to sample Text, PowerPoint, Audio and Video files.

    The Functions of Crime

    Friday, March 11th, 2016

     

    This PowerPoint file combines text, graphics, audio and video to outline four types of Functionalist theory on crime and deviance:

    1. Durkheimian,
    2. Strain (Merton),
    3. General Strain
    4. Subcultural.

    A self-selected, unrepresentative of anyone-but-themselves, sample of reviewers have described this resource as:

    “Brilliant”; “Utterly amazing” and “Too complicated to follow”.

    Is this, as Meatloaf so perceptively once asserted, a case of “Two out of Three Ain’t Bad”?

    Judge for yourself…