The A-level Gender Gap: A Visual Tool

Although I’ve posted before about the gender gap in subject choice, the focus has largely been on explanations for the gap in various broad subject strands (see, for example, Archer 2013). While this type of analysis is, of course, vital, what sometimes gets overlooked in the rush to explain is data that actually allows students […]

Visual Media: Study Booklet

Following hard on the heels of the previous “visual media” offering comes this 18-page Pdf Study Booklet. It’s packed to the rafters with information presented in a variety of simple, visually-attractive, ways under six main headings with sub-headings as required: New Media: changes, digital optimism and pessimism Ownership and Control: trends, patterns, theories. Globalisation: cultural […]

Visual Media: Theories and Representations

As you probably know by the number of blog posts featuring the word “visual“, I’m a sucker for anything that smacks of “visual sociology” (the clue is probably in what I do…) and I recently chanced upon what I think are two very neat “picture-type” pdf resources covering: 1. Media Theories: the material here involves […]

Visual Aids for Sampling and Statistics

Finding ways to introduce stuff like sampling (in Sociology) and statistical analysis (in Psychology) can, at the best of times, be difficult, so any type of visual aid, from simple graphics to video walkthroughs, is likely to be a useful time-saver for teachers and students alike. As luck would have it, the two web pages […]

Visual Notes

The Sociology Guy has been busy putting together what he calls “quick glance revision notes” for his web site (which, apropos of nothing, is well worth a visit because it contains lots of good stuff) – what might be described as visual notes or mini learning tables / knowledge organisers tied to a specific idea, […]

Visualising Social Mobility: A Mountain to Climb?

Broadly-speaking, the underlying idea here is to both make the study of social mobility slightly less dull and to replace a somewhat hackneyed, not-to-say, highly misleading visualisation of mobility (“a ladder”) with something a little more dynamic and visually thought-provoking (“climbing a mountain”). Although this post could be more accurately described as a “Lesson Suggestion” […]

Visual Sociology: Picturing Inequality

As regular readers of this blog will know, I’m a big fan of using graphic material (pictures and illustrations rather than examples of extreme physical violence) to both illustrate sociological ideas and encourage students to think a little more deeply about such ideas and how they can be applied to increase their depth of sociological […]

Visualising Routine Activities Theory

Routine Activities Theory has been described (by me, just now) as one of the key theoretical contributions to the development of Situational Crime Prevention strategies and techniques. In broad terms it sees crime as the outcome of both “opportunity” (Mayhew, 1976; Clarke, 1988) and “routine activities” (Cohen and Felson 1979) and represents, for Felson and […]

Visualising Strain Theory

Although examples of Merton’s “Responses to Strain” are fairly straightforward I always think it helps students if they can visualise the basic idea involved – something this simple image I came across on Twitter (apologies, but I don’t know who created it) does very well, I think. So, on the basis you can take a […]

Experiments in Visual Sociology

As you might expect from someone who makes films I like to explore visual ways of adding content to what can be fairly plain text information and this particular project is the result of just such an exploration. The objective here was to distil essential course information into a series of simple tableaux that highlight […]