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Posts Tagged ‘psychology’

Psychology Teachers Toolkit(s)

Friday, September 18th, 2020

A few years back (around 7 or 8 to be precisely imprecise), Psychology Teacher Michael Griffin “with the help of TES forums and colleagues” put together a Teachers Toolkit running to around 100 pages of Lesson Notes, Starters and Plenaries, Introductions and Simulations, Studies and Theories, and Self / Peer assessment Strategies.

Part of the Online Toolkit…

While, in my less-than-humble-opinion, this remains something of a Gold Standard for teacher-collaboration (it’s well-worth grabbing because it’s likely to save you a lot of time, effort, trouble and tears. I’m not certain about the last one, but the first three definitely) the British Psychological Society (BPS) have teamed-up with the Association for the Teaching of Psychology (ATP) to create a new and slightly-different Online Teachers Toolkit designed to cover four main areas:

  • Open evenings: a host of ideas and activities ideal for face to face or virtual events
  • Classroom posters: ready to print and display – including “what is psychology?” and “common myths”
  • Mental health and wellbeing guidance: tips and advice to support positive wellbeing in your classroom
  • Practical activities: step by step guides for practical activities to enhance learning in your classroom
  • The payload for all of the above are Teacher and Student Resources (from an Open Evening PowerPoint to a range of Activity Packs on areas like Harlow’s Monkey experiments, Stroop Effect materials and so forth) that promise to build into a useful term-by-term collection.

    To be honest, the resources are currently a little, shall we say, underwhelming?, particularly when compared to its illustrious predecessor (no-relation) but everyone’s got to start somewhere so it’s worth giving it a butcher’s and a chance.

    And if this all seems like a lukewarm welcome to the new Toolkit, it’s not meant to be.

    At least the BPS is interested in – and seems to value – A-level teachers.

    Not something of which you could reasonably accuse its sociological counterpart

    Teaching Techniques: Pre-Questioning

    Friday, May 15th, 2020

    “Asking questions” of students is pretty-much a staple of any teacher’s toolkit, which is fair enough, because as Jarrett (2107) notes:

    The “testing effect” is well-established in psychology: this is the finding that answering questions about what you’ve learned leads to better retention than simply studying the material for longer. Testing is beneficial because the act of recall entrenches learned material in our memories, and when we can’t answer, this helps us make our future revision more targeted”.

    Testing, therefore, has a range of educational benefits for both teachers – such as checking how effective their teaching of a particular topic has been – and students in that answering questions appears to encourage better information retention.

    This type of practice, for reasons that are somewhat obvious, can be called post-questioning: students attempt to learn something, by viewing a short film, for example, and are then questioned on what they’ve learnt “after the event”.

    This, you may be thinking, makes sense and is how it probably should be.

    And you wouldn’t be wrong.

    There is, however, another way of asking questions that is slightly more counter-intuitive in that it involves asking questions before students have studied something. This is known as pre-questioning and, on the face of things probably sounds a little pointless.

    Bear with me however, as I outline two types of pre-questioning and suggest exactly how and why they might be useful to your teaching in different contexts.

    Type of Pre-Questioning

    Lancaster Lockdown Psychology Seminar Series

    Tuesday, May 12th, 2020

    Lancaster University, a place where, coincidentally, I spent 3 years of my life studying, have announced a series of “interactive live talks from experts in the Department of Psychology” that are open to anyone.

    All you need is the Microsoft Teams app or you can view – and interact if you want – using a web browser.

    The latter allows you to join a seminar anonymously if you so choose.

    Which is either a commendable attempt to open everything up to as many people as possible or a hostage to fortune.

    I’m hoping it’s the former.

    A little weirdly, the advertising for the series is being posted from a Lancaster University WordPress page that seems to have been created in 2011 but never used for anything.

    Until now.

    So I’m guessing this is something of a mend-and-make-do effort on the part of the Psychology Department, which, if that’s the case, more power to them.

    Anyway, the seminars are 30-minute talks about “contemporary areas of psychological research” with, as I’ve suggested, an interactive element in that you can ask the Speaker questions – anonymously or otherwise. The format, in this respect, is a bit like a lecture: a 30-minute talk followed by 30 minutes for participants to ask questions.

    The Seminars are being held every Tuesday from 7.30 – 8.30pm, starting 12th May, and have the following talks lined-up:

    12th May 2020: Dr Lara Warmelink: Lying: the good, the bad, and the ugly

    19th May:  Dr Calum Hartley: Children’s understanding of ownership

    26th May: Dr Sally Linkenauger: The Pint Glass Illusion:  Large Distortions in the Perceived Shape of Everyday Objects

    2nd June: Prof Charlie Lewis: Developmental Psychology in the Courts: Can we help children provide more convincing evidence?

    9th June: Dr Ryan Boyd: How to Talk About Your Feelings: The Peculiar Relationship Between Words and Emotions.

    Discovering Psychology

    Monday, February 10th, 2020

    Discovering Psychology was “A video instructional series on introductory psychology for college and high school classrooms and adult learners” consisting of 26 30-minute TV programs narrated by Philip Zimbardo and produced in association with the American Psychological Association.

    The programs were originally aired in 1990 and a set of “updated resources” to accompany the programs were created in 2001. Although they’re obviously a little dated, both technologically and pedagogically, in some respects, in others they represent an interesting resource for teachers and students alike.

    I don’t know where the original films now reside, but it’s possible to find some of the programs on YouTube if you want to search for them.

    Whether any search is going to be worth the effort is a moot point, but the resources now available probably are worth exploring for their mix of Notes, classic experiments and key word glossaries.

    Psychology: Aspects of Sleep

    Monday, January 20th, 2020

    Four short teaching films, now available On Demand, covering different aspects of sleep research:

    1. Why Do We Sleep? [4.20]

    We’ll spend about a third of our lives asleep. But why?  Why do we need to sleep? Filmed at a University Sleep Laboratory, this short film demonstrates the effect of lack of sleep and why it is so essential to brain function and, ultimately, to survival.

    2. The Structure of Sleep [2.30]

    Until relatively recently what happens while we sleep was a mystery. But that changed with the advent of polysomnography, the electrical recording of brain activity. This short film provides students with a clear visual introduction to the stages of sleep. It also shows why we can’t fully understand our waking lives without understanding how sleep works.

    3. Insomnia: Causes and Treatments [5.32]

    ‘Insomnia’, says one of the respondents we interviewed, ‘can be as debilitating as a physical injury’. This film looks at the causes of insomnia, the cycle of sleeplessness, and Professor Kevin Morgan explains some of the treatments and their effectiveness.  

    4. Sleep, Memory & Learning [3.32]

    While sleep rests and repairs the brain, it continues to be active and sleep psychologists believe one of the things it’s doing is helping to consolidate memories. This short film looks at Professor Gaskell’s research comparing participants who learn in the morning and are tested in the evening with those who learn in the evening and are tested in the morning after sleeping. It also provides students with very good for advice about the best time to learn new information.   

    Psychology Films 5 | Debates

    Friday, May 10th, 2019

    The fifth and final – at least for the time being as we concentrate on sociology and crime (of the filmic as opposed to “actually committing it” variety) – set of films in our marathon psycho upload looks at some key debates in psychology.

    As ever, the films are designed as short, highly-focused, introductions to a topic, with the emphasis on outlining and explaining key ideas, applications and evaluations relevant to an a-level or ap psychology course of study.

    The Ethics of Abortion 
    7 minutes
    The controversies surrounding abortion involve a clash between two fundamental rights: the rights of the unborn child, or foetus, and the rights of the mother.

    This film begins with the storm created by the US case of Roe vs Wade and then provides students with an unbiased analysis of the ethical issues underlying demands for the criminalisation and the legalisation of abortion.

    Free Will and Determinism 
    7 minutes
    Do we really have free will?
    And, if so, from where does it come?

    In this film, Professor Patrick Haggard explains the differences between free will and behavioural, psychic and neurological determinism.

    We then reconstruct Benjamin Libet’s seminal experiment on determinism, showing its implications for understanding consciousness and explaining human behaviour.

    Click to read more

    Psychology Films 3 | Non-Experimental Methods

    Monday, May 6th, 2019

    The third batch of new psychology films uploaded to the website focuses on the “other side” of research methods with 4 short films looking at non-experimental methods.

    As with Experimental Methods and Issues in Psychology the emphasis is on providing strong introductions to a specific method or concept. Each of the films includes an overview of its chosen topic, how it has been applied in a particular study or studies and an evaluation of its strengths / weaknesses / limitations. 

    Naturalistic Observation 
    4 minutes
    Some research questions in psychology involve getting out and seeing how people actually behave in real life situations and this involves naturalistic observation.

    Using several key studies, this film illustrates different techniques of naturalistic observation, why psychologists use this method, some of the difficulties involved, and the limitations of the method.

    Self-Report Methods 
    5 minutes
    Self-report methods gather data directly from the participants and this film illustrates and compares two types of self-report method: questionnaires and interviews. This involves looking at some of the problems and limitations common to all self-report methods and how they can be avoided or overcome.

    Correlations 
    4 minutes
    Correlations are relationships and this film begins by illustrating how the strength and direction of those relationships is measured.

    It then uses real research studies to illustrate their uses, limitations and how easily correlation data can be misused.

    Case studies 
    6 minutes
    This film uses the well-known case of ‘Genie’, a girl kept in solitary confinement from infancy until she was 13, to illustrate how and why case are used, what they can offer psychological researchers, their limitations and some of the ethical issues that can often arise through their application.

    Make A Pitch: selling sociological sausages

    Wednesday, October 17th, 2018

    In response to the silent clamour (that only I could hear apparently) for something a little more substantial and pdfeffy, I’ve created a short booklet based around the “Selling Sociological Sausages” Lesson Outline I’ve previously posted.

    It’s basically a pdf version of the post, although it both clarifies the different versions and changes a few bits and pieces relating to the simulation / activity. While these changes are relatively trivial they do, I think, help to firm-up the exercise and, in one instance, make it a little more coherent.

    The other thing I’ve done is change the name of the activity to Make A Pitch, with Selling Sociological Sausages as more of a sub-heading now. It doesn’t really change anything or make much of a difference but perhaps gives the casual browser a bit more of an idea about the nature of the activity.

    The only other thing to note is that although I’m much too lazy (probably) to create a separate booklet, if you’re a psychology teacher it’s perfectly possible to apply the activity to your subject. All you really need to do is change “sociology” to “psychology” (oh yes) and substitute your own favoured perspectives, psychologists, theories or methods.

    Lend Your Mind To Science

    Saturday, October 13th, 2018

    Testable Minds seems to be an off-shoot of Testable – a web site that provides a relatively simple way to create behavioural experiments and surveys (there’s a free option if you want to give it a try. Alternatively, if you’re merely curious about what the site can do there are a few examples to explore, including a picture naming test and a face detection test).

    While Testable focuses on the creation of on-line experiments, for Testable Minds the focus is squarely on participating in online psychological and behavioural experiments.

    In other words, it’s a way of recruiting respondents for whatever psychological experiment the researcher is currently running.

    While this gives students, as the site suggests “the opportunity to contribute to our quest to understand how the mind works”, participating in the various experiments on offer has a couple of further attractions:

    1. It gives students first-hand experience of psychological research. This could be useful for teachers who want to introduce a little real-world relevance to their classes.

    2. Not only do students get to participate in and contribute to various real-life psychological experiments currently being conducted worldwide, they also get paid for the privilege of participating.

    Admittedly the fees aren’t huge – typically $1 – $3 (around 75p – £2) per experiment – but given that you’re actually being paid to advance the sum store of the world’s knowledge (possibly), that doesn’t seem like too bad a deal.

    Teaching Timelines

    Thursday, September 20th, 2018

    A free, easy-to-use online Timeline creator that allows you to incorporate text, images and video.

    Back-in-the-day, when I was still classroom teaching, one of the techniques I occasionally used was the Teaching Timeline, something I found particularly useful for Introductory Sociology (back when a “History of Sociological Thought” was mandatory) and, for some reason, Crime and Deviance.

    For the latter I always found it useful to create a “Theory Timeline” that helped students understand when different criminological theories first appeared and, more-importantly, how they were connected to and influenced by each other.

    A third type of Timeline – “Dead, White, European Men” – was one I used whenever I wanted to be a bit provocative and promote some discussion about whether or not sociology was basically just about the musings of the aforementioned White European Males who Are No-Longer-With-Us.

    Usually on a Friday afternoon in the deep mid-winter.

    For some reason.

    Anyway.

    The thinking behind Teaching Timelines was, somewhat unusually for me at this time, tied to the idea of anchorage. That is, an attempt to provide a structure for various ideas through a sense of time and place, such that students could understand how theories of crime, for example, developed, why and how they were criticised and what, if anything, came out of this process.

    Back then, Teaching Timelines were created with pen and paper before being stuck to the wall (where they slid slowly and painfully to the floor, were ripped by carelessly passing bags and generally made to look a bit sad and dilapidated after a couple of months wear-and-tear). They were also, if I’m honest, a little-bit-crap in a “felt-tip pen plus a few stuck-on pictures” kind of way.

    Right now, things are a little different because with something like Flippity you can create free, web-based, Timelines that incorporate text, graphics, pictures and video (or at least those hosted on YouTube – here’s a Sociology playlist and a Psychology playlist to get you started if you need it).

    Creating A Timeline

    Creating a Timeline is relatively simple – it’s just a matter of entering text – and any links to pictures and videos you want to incorporate – into a Google Docs template (you can find full instructions about how to access the template, enter data and the like, here if you need them).

    To do this you’ll need to have a (free) Google Docs account (you can create one here if you don’t have one already).

    While Teaching Timelines can, of course, be your own personal creation it’s also possible to turn them into an active-learning, co-operative, exercise involving your students finding relevant text, images and videos for you to add to the final Timeline.

    Or not, as the case may be.

    Introduction to Psychology: The Noba Collection

    Tuesday, May 15th, 2018

    The simplest way to describe The Noba Project is that it’s a collection of free Introductory Psychology (Psychology 101) modules designed to fulfil, in the words of its creators, three main aims:

    1. To reduce the financial burden on students by providing access to free educational content.
    2. To provide instructors with a platform to customize educational content to better suit their curriculum.
    3. To present free, high-quality material written by a collection of experts and authorities in the field of psychology.

    Each module is designed as a series of standalone texts covering a particular area of psychology (Science, Development, Personality and so forth), each containing a number of different chapters. Psychology as Science, for example, covers, among many other things:

    • Why Science?
    • Conducting Psychology in the Real World.
    • Research Design.
    • Statistical Thinking.

    Taken together, however, the modules are designed to replicate a complete Introductory Psychology course textbook, albeit one aimed at American undergraduates (Psychology 101). The level of these courses, however, is not dissimilar to the level found in A-level Psychology (particularly at A2).

    Customisation

    Aside from being both free and freely-available online, however, one really interesting feature of the site is that teachers are encouraged to take and customise the chapters in any way they want. This has obvious advantages for A-level teachers who may want to customise the basic text to meet the requirements of their own particular Specification and students. In this respect teachers may:

    • Copy the text
    • Paste it into Word or a favourite Desktop Publisher
    • Remove unneeded text.
    • Add their own text, pictures, illustrations.
    • Distribute personalised chapters to their students…

    This customisation aspect could prove a real boon to teachers who like to produce their own resources tailored to the requirements of their own teaching methods and students. While the Noba text serves as a time-saving basic template, all kinds of other information can be added to personalise the look, feel and content.

    Print Versions

    If you don’t have the time or inclination to do this – or you like your students to have a physical textbook in their sweaty little hands – there’s an option to buy printed versions of the chapters or, indeed, the complete textbook. While this can get a little expensive – particularly if you’re ordering copies from outside the USA – one interesting feature is that you can customise the printed textbook by only including the chapters you teach and excluding those you don’t.

    Overall, however, you decide to use the chapters available this is a potentially useful resource, either as a customised textbook or as a supplementary resource for your main psychology textbook.

    Free Psychology Textbooks

    Wednesday, May 2nd, 2018

    Following soft on the heels of the open-source Psychology textbook comes a brief selection of additional psychology texts you and your students may or may not find useful. The list includes 4 complete textbooks, either released under a Creative Commons license or as an out-of-print edition a of current textbook. You need to be aware, if you use them, these texts are a few years “out of date” (I’ve avoided including anything more than 10 years old) and don’t exactly match any UK A-level Specification. While most, if not all, of the following are generally aimed at an American undergraduate “Introductory Psychology” audience the information is generally reflective of a-level psychology, albeit more A2 than AS.

    1. Psychology: Themes and Variations (7th edition)
    This American “Introductory Psychology textbook”, probably released around 2009 in this version, is mainly aimed at first year undergraduates (Psychology 101, at a guess) but its design and content probably makes most, if not necessarily all, of the information it contains suitable for a-level students.

    2. Psychology: Themes and Variations (9th edition) Chapter 1
    The opening chapter in the 9th (2011) edition of the textbook serves as a general introduction to the study of psychology.

    (more…)

    Psychology Learning Tables | 5

    Thursday, March 8th, 2018

    It’s been a while since I’ve posted any Psychology Learning Tables (Knowledge Organisers by any other name) so I thought I’d make a start on the backlog I’ve collected so far (if you want to see the previous Tables you can find them here).

    If you’re unfamiliar with the format, Learning Tables are used to summarise a section of the course onto a single sheet of A4 (although some Tables do take minor liberties with this basic format). While the general focus is, as the name suggests, “knowledge” many of these tables interpret this quite widely to include examples, applications and evaluation.

    Which, as far as I can see, is Quite A Good Thing.

    If you’re not as convinced – or you want to edit the information contained in each Table to your own particular teaching and learning preference – I’ve left the Tables in Word format for your editing pleasure.

    Slavishly following the precedent I foolishly set for myself, this next batch of Tables are in no particular order other than alphabetical:

    (more…)

    Issues & Debates in Psychology

    Wednesday, March 7th, 2018

    Issues & Debates in Psychology

    with Dr Steve Taylor, University of London & ShortCutstv

    Issues & Debates is a key topic on both AQA & OCR & it’s also a great ‘transferable skill’.
    This workshop uses an approach, developed over several years, that helps students’ with understanding, comparing, applying & evaluating Issues & Debates.

    Clarifies the more difficult questions, such as:

    • How can I illustrate the interaction between Nature & Nurture?
    • What is Free Will/Determinism really about?
    • When can & can’t Reductionism be used as a critique?
    • What is Socially Sensitive Research?
    • What is an ethical issue?
    • And many more…

    Exam guidance and practice for both specific questions & the opportunities for bringing Issues & Debates into a range of other questions.

    Handouts summarise key up-to-date illustrative research studies.

    Free Revision Videos on Issues & Debates provided for each topic.

    What Teachers Say
    Steve was engaging and had students’ attention the whole time. He gave them a different perspective that will enhance their essays and hopefully boost exam grades.
    Priya Bradshaw Aquinas College

    He was incredibly engaging. Definitely booking again!
    Amy Speechley St Gregory’s College

    Steve’s visit was loved by all the students and it enthused them to want more. A big thank you!
    Sue Martin Farnham College

    The workshop material was excellent, with studies that both illustrated the positions in the debates and really developed students’ understanding.
    Rachel Hume Edgbarrow School

    Cost (inclusive & regardless of number of students)
    Half day: £300
    Full day: £500

    For more information:
    Email: steve@shortcutstv.com
    Call: 07771-561521

    Why Did No-One Help James Bulger?

    Monday, February 26th, 2018

    “We’ll probably never really know what made two 10 year olds, Robert Thompson and Jon Venables, abduct, torture and then kill two year old James Bulger on a terrible February day a quarter of a century ago.

    But there’s another question arising from the James Bulger murder that has implications for all of us.

    Why did no-one intervene to help the defenceless toddler? “

    In this short article, “Why Did No-One Help James Bulger?”, Steve Taylor looks at the case in the context of Bystander Intervention.

    Learning Mats

    Sunday, February 25th, 2018

    Learning mats – originally laminated sheets containing simple questions, learning prompts and drawing spaces – have been around for some time at the lower (particularly primary) levels of our education system, but with the increasing interest in Knowledge Organisers, which in many respects they resemble, they’re starting to gain some traction at both GCSE and A-level.

    Having said that, I’ve only managed to find a couple of examples of their use in A-level Sociology and none at all in Psychology. This may reflect a lack of knowledge about Learning Mats, a lack of interest in their application to A-level study or, more-likely perhaps, a lack of time to create them.

    (more…)

    The Memory Clock

    Friday, February 23rd, 2018

    Although revision, in all its different forms and guises, is an integral part of any a-level sociology (or psychology) course it’s sometimes difficult to know how to help students revise in the most efficient, effective and productive way – and this is where the Memory Clock comes into play.

    The Memory Clock is a revision system developed by Dr Caroline Creaby of Sandringham School, a mixed Comprehensive situated in St Albans, Hertfordshire that’s fast-developing into a hot-bed of interesting teaching and learning research led by practicing teachers.

    If you want to know more about the work they do inside and outside of the classroom have a look at the Sandagogy web site. The excellent Learning Journals they publish are well worth a read.

    Anyway, back to the main point of this post.

    The Memory Clock is an easy-to-learn revision routine designed to help students structure their time in such a way as to make revision focused and productive. The pdf I’ve posted is a cut-down version of Training Manual that focuses on three things:

    1. The various elements in the clock.

    2. A short explanation of these elements.

    3. A practice session based on a Sociological question. Although this example is “the future of childhood” you can obviously change this to whatever question you want your students to practice. Similarly, if you’re teaching Psychology just substitute your own question of choice.

    Try it.

    You (and your students) won’t regret it.

    Update

    If you want to save a bit of time (pun intended) there are a lot of “Memory Clock Templates” dotted around the web. Given the constraints imposed by having to stick to a clock system, however, these are much-of-a-muchness, so there’s probably no great advantage to be had searching for them. However, since some kind of pre-prepared template is better than none (unless you’re really into revision procrastination – making the materials you need to “properly revise” means you have to spend less time actually doing the boring revision part) I’ve found some examples you might find helpful:

    Revision Clock PowerPoint
    Revision Clock Picture
    Revision Clock PowerPoint templates (a selection of slightly different templates).

    Example Revision Clocks

    Sociology Revision Clock

    If you want an example or two of how the Memory Clock can work, Vicki Woolven has created a set of Sociology clocks in both PowerPoint and Pdf formats you might find useful.

    These cover major course areas – Family, Education, Stratification, Methods, Crime – subdivided into 5-minute revision segments.

    Completed Revision Clock

    You can, of course, tailor these to the specific requirements of your particular course by editing the PowerPoint…

    If you want to see an example of how a teacher has used this particular Revision Clock in the context of the sociology of education, you’ll find a nice one on Kate Flatley’s Instagram feed

    PsychoPepper: Approaches in Psychology

    Saturday, January 6th, 2018

    I first came across this Blog via a PsychoPepper Twitter post drawing attention to the availability of this Approaches in Psychology booklet that’s hard to sum-up in a simple statement. It mixes a range of formats – textbook, revision book, workbook – into something rather wonderful and, dare I say, exceptionally useful for both students and teachers.

    The closest thing I can compare the booklet to is the Psychology Teacher’s Toolkit although even here the comparison falls short; whereas the latter is a collection of lesson ideas loosely grouped around different themes the former is a coherently-structured 50-papge+ document focused on the notion of different psychological approaches. The blog’s well worth a visit just to get your hands on the booklet alone, but once you’re there take a bit of time to have a look around at the other free resources on offer.

    Classroom Resources, for example, contains Lesson Plans for a number of areas (such as Research Methods, Aggression and Biopsychology) that, at the very least, will save you a lot of time and effort.

    The Teaching Blog section, on the other hand, focuses on planning and pedagogy – schemes of work, teaching tips and so forth.

    There’s also a handy “Glossary” of key terms and a “Marking and Feedback” section designed to help students understand what they are being asked in exam questions and how to provide the answers…

    Update

    I’ve since managed to find four more high-quality booklets from the same source. As with their Approaches counterpart, these are professionally-produced and pack in a shed-load of useful information:

    Psychopathology

    Research Methods 1

    Research Methods 2

    Aggression

    Conducting Psychological Research

    Wednesday, September 27th, 2017

    This is a free chapter, from an unpublished textbook by Shelia Kennison of Oklahoma State University, that you can either read online or download as a pdf document.

    The chapter covers a range of ideas and issues focused on the research process:

    • different research methodologies
    • causality
    • experimentation
    • representative sampling
    • reliability and validity
    • Type I and Type II errors
    • ethics

    The text also includes a couple of pages of “key terms” plus a set of questions based on the text designed to assess student understanding.

    While it’s not exactly ground-breaking in terms of content and design it seems solid enough for A-level / AP Psychology.

    Free Chapter: The Psychology of Addictive Behaviour

    Tuesday, January 10th, 2017

    The third – and probably final – free chapter from Holt and Lewis’ “A2 Psychology: The Student’s Textbook”, this one covers addictive behaviour in terms of main areas:

    1. Models

    Biological, cognitive and learning models of addiction, including explanations for initiation, maintenance and relapse

    Explanations for specific addictions, including smoking and gambling

    2. Factors affecting addictive behaviour

    Vulnerability to addiction including self-esteem, attributions for addiction and social context of addiction

    The role of media in addictive behavior 

    3. Reducing addictive behaviour

    Models of prevention, including theory of reasoned action and theory of planned behaviour

    Types of intervention, including biological, psychological, public health interventions and legislation, and their effectiveness.

     

    A2 Psychology: Free Chapter on Relationships

    Friday, January 6th, 2017

    A couple of months ago I posted a free chapter on Research Methods  from Holt and Lewis’ “A2 Psychology: The Student’s Textbook” and this latest offering is on Relationships and covers three main areas:

    1. The formation, maintenance and breakdown of romantic relationships

    Theories of the formation, maintenance and breakdown of romantic relationships: e.g. reinforcement-affect theory, social exchange theory, sociobiological theory

    1. Human reproductive behavior

    The relationship between sexual selection and human reproductive behaviour
    Evolutionary explanations of parental investment: e.g. sex differences, parent-offspring conflict.

    1. Effects of early experience and culture on adult relationships

    The influence of childhood and adolescent experiences on adult relationships, including parent-child relationships and interaction with peers.
    The nature of relationships in different cultures.

     

    A2 Psychology: Research Methods Free Chapter

    Friday, November 4th, 2016

    holt-and-lewisOne of the simple pleasures of Wandering the Web™ for a living, made all the more enjoyable by that intangible sense of the unexpected (I know, I live my life through contradictions), is coming across Stuff That Is Free.

    My not-so-little face lights up at the mere thought of finding Something For Nothing, even though that “Something” invariably ends up stored somewhere on a half-forgotten hard drive, waiting for that magic moment when “it might be useful to someone, sometime”.

    This behaviour, which I’m calling “Simple Squirrelling Syndrome” – because I can – has a yet deeper dimension (I’m toying with the idea of “Simple Squirrelling Syndrome Squared”, but it may need some work). Some years after the initial find-and-save I get to spend further pleasurable hours sifting through multiple hard drives “looking for that study I know I saved somewhere, under a name that made perfect sense at the time but which is now largely meaningless”, during which I rediscover all kinds of things I’d forgotten I had. My pleasure is quite obviously redoubled. Probably. I’m not altogether certain I’ve quite mastered mathematical analogies.

    Anyway, be that as it may, the actual point of this rambling preambling is that I came across this sample chapter on Research Methods from Holt and Lewis’ “A2 Psychology: The Student’s Textbook” and thought of you.

    On the downside it looks like a chapter from the 2009 edition, but on the upside you have to ask yourself when was the last time a textbook said anything startlingly-new about the Hypothetico-Deductive Model? Or “the Research Process”? Sampling? Probability and significance? My case rests.

    The chapter also has a very pretty, colourful, layout, which in my book counts for quite a lot.

    Seven Sims in Seven Days – Day 5: Trial by Jury

    Saturday, October 1st, 2016

    sim_trailAs with some of the others in this series, “Trial by Jury” is a building block sim that gives you a basic template that can be used to organise and run a wide range of possible simulations. In basic terms if there’s an area of the Sociology / Psychology course that involves comparing and contrasting two opposing viewpoints it can be adapted to the Trial by Jury format using this template.

    As a way of exampling this the package uses the (sociological) example of “Positivism On Trial” (effectively a debate between Positivism / Interpretivism at As-level).

    This is quite a time-consuming simulation and it’s probably best-suited to occasional use (unless you’ve completely flipped your classroom, in which case it’s something you could frequently use).

    For example, it could be used at the end of a specific teaching session (such as “secularisation”) as a way of bringing all the different arguments and evaluations together. Alternatively you might find it useful for a series of “end of course” sessions as a way of structuring student revision.

    Psychology ShortCuts: Offender Profiling

    Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016

    As with its sociological sister, ShortCuts to Psychology is a new series of free films designed to clearly and concisely illustrate key ideas and concepts across a range of topics – from family, through deviance to psychological theory and methods. The films are:

    • short: between 30 seconds and a couple of minutes
    • focused on definitions, explanations and analysis
    • framed around expert sociologists in their field.

     

    In this film Professor David Wilson offers up a definition of offender profiling.

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    Beyond Genetics

    Tuesday, August 2nd, 2016

    “Nature or Nurture?” is a long-running debate in psychology, one heavily-influenced by developments in genetics and a rise in the popular belief that “dna is destiny”: the idea human behaviour is broadly is determined by a “good” or a “bad” roll of the genetic dice.

    This 3-part film, featuring contributions from Dr Nessa Carey and Dr Guy Sutton, goes “Beyond Genetics” to explore recent developments in the field of Epigenetics that show the way genes actually work is shaped by environmental influences – a development that introduces a new and exciting dimension to the debate, for both psychologists and sociologists.

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