Sociology in Focus for A2: Free Textbook

Sociology in Focus for A2 is, as you may have guessed, the companion volume to the previously-posted AS text and it’s no great surprise that its design and layout perfectly complements its AS counterpart. This includes the by-now standard colour-coded sections, lots of pictures, activities and questions that, at the time, were considered a quite […]

Sociology Revision Cards

Back in the day, before the invention of Learning Tables / Knowledge Organisers, students had to make do with Revision Cards – lists of all the key ideas and concepts you might need to know for an exam (you’ll find a selection here if you want to take a trip back to a time before […]

The Sociological Detectives: Ch-Ch-Changing NRMs

Another in the New Religious Movements series of PowerPoint Presentations, this uses the Sociological Detective format to investigate a “crime scene” to unearth various clues based on Eileen Barker’s observations about why NRM’s change over time. The basic idea is that as each clue is unveiled it contributes towards an understanding of Movement change and […]

New Religious Movements: Who Joins?

Another PowerPoint in what’s rapidly evolving into some sort of NRM-based series. This, as you might expect, complements the previously-posted Characteristics and Pathways Presentations and draws once more on the work of Professor Eileen Barker. There’s not a lot to say about it except that it’s a deceptively-simple Presentation that identifies and outlines Characteristics.

New Religious Movements: 6 Characteristics

Basic PowerPoint Presentation, designed for whole-class use, that identifies Barker’s 6 characteristics of New Religious Movements. The concept of New Religious Movements was initially developed, by writers such as Eileen Barker (1999), to reflect a general unease and dissatisfaction with the contemporary usefulness of the “sect – cult” distinction. More-specifically, the argument in favour of […]

Paranormal Activity: Another Dimension to the Secularisation Debate?

Although the secularisation debate in sociology has a number of different dimensions, involving arguments over issues like sacralisation, desacralisation, resacralisation, post-secularisation, religious fundamentalism and the like, one key assumption in the debate is rarely, if ever, questioned: the idea that “secularisation” is effectively a zero-sum game that consists of two, fundamentally-opposed, sides: 1. The Religious, […]

A-Level Revision Booklets: 1. Beliefs in Society

A couple of years ago I posted some A-level revision booklets / guides, one from Greenhead College on education  and three from Tudor Grange Academy (Culture and Identity, Education, Research Methods). On the basis that you can’t have too many revision booklets (although, thinking about it, you probably can) I thought I’d post a few […]

SociologySaviour Blog

I was looking for pictures of Arron Cicoural for a new film we’re editing on Labelling Theory when I stumbled across the rather interesting SociologySaviour Blog,  that unfortunately now looks as though it hasn’t been updated since mid-2016. This is something of a shame because the material it contains seems well-written and useful – although […]

Spaced Study: What It Is (and How To Do It)

Spaced Study or Spaced Practice is a theory of learning that argues, in a nutshell, that students study more effectively and retain more of the information they learn if the study period is “spaced” – or spread out over a number of hours / days – than if studying is “crammed” into short intensive blocks. […]

SCTV Weekly Round-Up

A little late, but worth the wait. Probably. Our weekly round-up of the sites and stories that are hot. Or not.