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NotAFactsheet: More Deviance

Thursday, May 18th, 2017

Three new NotAFactsheets to add to your growing collection covering:

1. Interactionism (labelling theory, personal and social identities, master labels)
2. Deviancy Amplification (an outline of the model plus the role of the media)
3. Critical Theory (Instrumental and Hegemonic Marxism, Critical Subcultures)

Each NotaFactsheet is available in two flavours: with and without short (1 or 2 minute) embedded video clips:

D4. Interactionism | Interactionism with short video clip 

D5. Deviancy Amplification | Deviancy Amplification with short video clip 

D6. Critical Theory | Critical Theory with short video clip

NotAFactsheet: Miscellaneous Methods

Friday, May 5th, 2017

Another small batch of NotAFactsheets covering a miscellaneous melange of methods-related stuff – some essential, some less so (but probably nice to know, just in case you want to impress the examiner with your wide-ranging and perceptive grasp of all things methodological. Or maybe not).

M9. Quantitative and Qualitative Data

M10. Strong and Weak Feminist thesis

M11. Types of Triangulation

M13. Objectivity, Subjectivity, Value-Freedom

NotAFactsheet: Crime and Deviance

Tuesday, May 2nd, 2017

I thought it would make a change from research methods to put together a few NotAFactsheets on crime and deviance, so here are the first products of what no-one’s calling a “radical new departure in NotAFactsheet production”.

These three efforts focus on and around Functionalist-type approaches to crime:

D1. Functionalist Approaches | D1. Functionalist Approaches (includes short video) Functionalism and Crime includes Durkheim on the functions of crime, Strain theory and General Strain Theory.

 D2. Administrative Criminology | D2. Administrative Criminology (includes short video) Administrative Criminology focuses on New Right ideas about crime prevention and management and outlines some general social policies associated with this approach.

D3. Right Realism Right Realism outlines the Broken Windows thesis – and it’s critics – in addition to noting a range of social policies that have stemmed from a right realist approach to crime.

 

 

NotAFactsheet: Sampling

Thursday, April 27th, 2017

If there was a competition for the least-loved part of the Sociology Specification it’s a fair bet that sampling would be somewhere off in the far distance, casually looking over its shoulder and taunting its competitors as it limped home in first place.

Loathe it or loathe it, however, you just can’t ignore sampling when it comes to revision – although, of course, that’s not quite true (quick translation: false). You can quite happily, if a little wantonly, ignore it in the probably-misplaced belief that the examiner doesn’t despise you enough to include a question on sampling in the exam. For what it’s worth*, it’s a distinct possibility they do, but don’t be upset by this. It’s nothing personal. Just part of the job description I think. 

So, on the off-chance this little preamble has convinced you it might be a Good Idea to give sampling at least a quick glance, I’ve hand-crafted three NotAFactsheets that are guaranteed to have you singing into the exam**: 

(more…)

NotAFactsheet: Interpretivist Methods

Thursday, April 20th, 2017

Continuing the Research Methods theme of recent posts, these NotAFactsheets focus on a range of methods associated with Interpretivist research:

M4a. Research Methods: this outlines different types of interview: semi-structured, unstructured and focus groups.

M4b. Research Methods: observational methods are one of the staples of Interpretivist research and this outlines non-participant observation, covert and overt participant observation.

M4c. Research Methods: while experimental methods are not conventionally associated with Interpretivism there have been a number of very interesting and influential field and natural experiments carried-out over the years. This NotAFactsheet outlines these and also provides an outline of documentary sources (with a bit of content analysis thrown-in for good measure).

 

NotAFactsheet: Research Ethics

Thursday, April 13th, 2017

This NotAFactsheet on Research Ethics is a slight departure from previous NotAFactsheets in that it comes in two flavours:

1. The normal “text with box-outs and pictures-if-you’re-lucky” version.

2.  An experimental version with an added bit of embedded video (click-the-pic-to-play).

Although not ideal, the video is in Flash (.flv) format for reasons that are much too boring to go into. Plus, the .flv format can be quite heavily compressed and means the video doesn’t add too many megabytes to the pdf file. I’ve deliberately kept the clip short – it just illustrates a simple mnemonic that I cut out of one of our films on Ethics – because it’s essentially just a test to see which people prefer.

If you choose this option you’ll need to download the pdf file because atm it won’t play online (probably).

Sociology Shortcuts: NotAFactsheets

Sunday, April 9th, 2017

Over the past few weeks I’ve published a small selection of Curriculum Press Sociology Factsheets and the response to these set me thinking about creating some of my own, using a similar format – although I’ve decided not to call what I’ve produced “Factsheets”, mainly because they aren’t.

Anyway, I posted my first attempt at a NotAFactsheet a week or so ago and since then I’ve been developing and refining the format in terms of both design and content. Whether or not I’ve managed to capture something useful is something for you to judge but I thought I’d post my first batch of NotAFactsheets anyway.

The basic idea, in case you’re not familiar with the general format, is to use NotAFactsheets in a range of possible ways, as:

  • basic introductory documents.
  • an extra source of student Notes.
  • a source of information when students miss part of a course.
  • a revision document.
  •  
    These are all based around “Approaches to Research” and, in the main, focus on an outline of different approaches. I have, however, included one on research methods to see if and how that works (at 5 pages it’s significantly longer than each of the others and I’m not sure if this format works as a NotAFactsheet).

    You can download the following NotAFactsheets:

    Positivism

    Positivist Research Methods

    Interpretivism

    Realism

    Feminism

    A Few More Psychology Factsheets

    Thursday, April 6th, 2017

    In a previous post I shared some examples of Curriculum Press Factsheets I’d found on my travels and this post offers a few more examples that might inspire you (and your students) to think about making your own…

     

    Attachment

    Autism

    Classical Conditioning

    Eyewitness Testimony

    Factors affecting the accuracy of eyewitness testimony

    A Few More Sociology Factsheets

    Sunday, April 2nd, 2017

    A previous post featured a selection of the Factsheets produced by The Curriculum Press  and since this post I’ve managed to collect a few more Factsheets from various corners of the Web.

    These, oddly enough, all relate in some way to Research Methods…

    Experiments

    Overt Participant Observation

    Positivism and Interpretivism

    Qualitative Research

    Crime statistics

    Psychology Factsheets: Buy or DIY?

    Monday, January 9th, 2017

    A couple of months ago this blog featured examples of Sociology Factsheets created and sold by the Curriculum Press and this month it’s the turn of Psychology, of which I’ve found the following examples:

     

    As with their sociological counterparts the basic design rules are relatively simple:

    • short topic notes focused on key knowledge points
    • illustrative examples
    • overviews of advantages and disadvantages
    • exam tips
    • short “test yourself” questions

     

    There are around 200 Factsheets currently available – and their web site does some good deals on subscription purchases – but an alternative is to get your students to make their own.

    All you need is some simple DeskTop Publishing software (like the free Serif PagePlus Starter Edition – it’s easy to learn and surprisingly powerful) and a little bit of planning and guidance from you…

     

    Sociology Factsheets: To Buy or DIY?

    Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016

    fsheetLike all good ideas, this one is simple but effective.

    Distil topic notes into key knowledge points, add illustrative examples and brief overviews of advantages and disadvantages, throw in some exam tips and short “test yourself” questions, call it a factsheet and sell it at a very reasonable price to teachers – which is exactly what the Curriculum Press (http://www.curriculum-press.co.uk) has done.

    If you want samples of the various factsheets (their web site lists around 160), there are a few scattered around the web that I’ve cobbled together and presented here for your viewing pleasure:  (more…)

    Revision Notes Creator

    Monday, October 21st, 2019
    Crime and Deviance Cheat Sheet

    I’ve previously posted about the idea of Sociology and Psychology Factsheets – reasonably short sets of Notes you can either buy “ready-made” from somewhere like The Curriculum Press or, if you’re a bit more adventurous (or short of cash), create yourself using Desktop-publishing software.

    If you’re interested in the latter – but don’t want to get down’n’dirty with the design and creation of your own bespoke Factsheets – Cheatography is an online resource you and your students might find useful.

    Despite the rather provocative name, Cheatography is actually just a contemporary update of the good old-fashioned cheat (or crib) sheet creator – albeit one that has all the bells and whistles (text, graphics, pictures and video) we’ve come to expect as standard in this digital age.

    It’s a means, in other words, of creating (and sharing) sheets of Notes quickly and efficiently that can be stored and viewed online or, if you prefer, saved as a pdf file for personal use.

    The big advantage of the site, apart from the fact it’s free to use (although online Cheat Sheets include advertising – even free has it’s price), is that it makes it easy to create well-structured revision-type Notes (or any other type of Notes, come to that).

    And that’s about it, really.

    How-To Guide

    Psychology Learning Tables | 8

    Tuesday, March 19th, 2019

    Another batch of lovingly-curated and assiduously alphabetised Learning Tables / Knowledge Organisers to keep your appetite for these very useful tools whetted, if not entirely satiated.

    Graded PEEL Learning Table

    As usual (if you missed the previous sets of Tables you can check them out here) the tables are a mix of styles – some are plain Notes, others are organised into a PEEL format and a few are PEEL Graded – and most are single or double A4 sheets. The exception is the Obedience Bundle, where I’ve gathered half-a-dozen or so Tables and bundled them together in one Word document. I’m not sure why. It just seemed the right thing to do at the time.

    If you fancy branching out a little, these professionally-produced Factsheets might prove a useful addition to the teaching toolbox.

    Sociology ShortCuts F’sheet

    Tuesday, April 4th, 2017

    I’ve posted a couple of times about the Sociology Factsheets produced by Curriculum Press –  particularly about how it might be an idea for teachers to get their students to make their own versions as both a revision aid and teaching resource for future sociology students – and I thought it might be interesting to have a go at something along these lines myself: particularly because having written a number of books for different exam boards over the past 10 or so years I’ve accumulated a large stock of words that could possibly be put to some more – and probably better – use as a revision-type resource.

    The upshot of playing-around with various words and pictures is my first ShortCuts Sheet on “Approaches to Research: Positivism” (for no better reason than the fact I had some underutilised text lying around that I thought might be easy to adapt to this format).

    If you’ve got any comments, suggestions etc. about why it’s brilliant / shite / could be improved please don’t hesitate to let me know…