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theory map
Theory Map

It’s been a while since I posted anything (busy is as busy does) and since I’ve just finished editing a new sociological methods film I thought I’d turn my hand to posting the final set of resources designed to enhance your experience and enjoyment of the free A2 textbook.

This set focuses squarely on sociological theory.

Admittedly, theory’s not everyone’s cup of tea, but personally I find it fascinating and not a little challenging.

The two are probably not unconnected.

Anyway, since trying to make the challenge a little-less daunting is my middle name (it’s not, obviously. That would just be ridiculous – akin to, say, a Mr and Mrs. Johnson naming their child “Alexander Boris de Pfeffel”. Less a name, some might say, than a drunken slip of the pen) these resources might help.

Overview Map: This is just a simple one-page guide to what has to be covered. As such, it could serve as a useful introduction to the topic (or “overview” as it’s technically known).

Revision Maps: These are more-substantial and detailed content overviews, focused around keywords / concepts in a spider diagram format. Aside from a basic “What is sociological theory?” map the main focus is on an historical overview of modern / postmodern theories: from the classic (Marx, Durkheim, Weber) to the more-esoteric (Lyotard, Baudrillard) by way of globalisation, structure and action. You probably get the drift.

Activity Answers: The Textbook has a whole host of activities that include lots-and-lots of lovely questions to keep your students amused for hours. Marking their answers might not be quite so amusing, so I’ve included example answers to every question. That way you can get your students to mark their own work. Tell them it’s good for their soul. Or whatever.

Worksheets: If, for some reason, you run out of questions and yet still need a little more “me time” hit them with these worksheets (not literally. It’s probably a sad indictment of Our Times that I have to include this disclaimer, but there you go). Some are individual questions, some involve small group work and yet others can be used for whole-class teaching / discussion (probably the ones to be using should some passing member of SMT be nosing around).

Let us know what you think:

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