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Archive for March, 2019

Mass Media 1 | Defining and Researching

Friday, March 22nd, 2019
Second half…

Kicking my heels between edits I thought I might dig-out some old Notes (they were originally written around 5 years ago for a professional publishing project that, for one reason or another, never came together) and knock them into some sort of shape in the sincere belief that someone might find them useful.

The “shape knocking” mainly involves slotting the text from a plain Word format into a slightly-more-attractive pdf format (with a few pithy pictures thrown in to prettify things a bit). I haven’t done much actual updating of the basic text – there are a few newer bits-and-pieces where I decided something needed a little more contemporary polish – which is why it doesn’t contain much that’s particularly up-to-the-minute in terms of research studies. Although these tend to be a few years old, I’ve mainly (but not necessarily always…) referenced them when I want to establish a particular point or principle that has contemporary relevance

I’ve started with Defining and Researching the Mass Media, mainly because I haven’t done a lot in this area over the past few years and it’s a topic I’ve always found reasonably interesting and as far as content goes, this particular set of Notes is something of a game of two halves:

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Psychology Learning Tables | 8

Tuesday, March 19th, 2019

Another batch of lovingly-curated and assiduously alphabetised Learning Tables / Knowledge Organisers to keep your appetite for these very useful tools whetted, if not entirely satiated.

Graded PEEL Learning Table

As usual (if you missed the previous sets of Tables you can check them out here) the tables are a mix of styles – some are plain Notes, others are organised into a PEEL format and a few are PEEL Graded – and most are single or double A4 sheets. The exception is the Obedience Bundle, where I’ve gathered half-a-dozen or so Tables and bundled them together in one Word document. I’m not sure why. It just seemed the right thing to do at the time.

If you fancy branching out a little, these professionally-produced Factsheets might prove a useful addition to the teaching toolbox.

Psychology Learning Tables | 7

Sunday, March 17th, 2019

I haven’t posted any new Psychology Learning Tables / Knowledge Organisers* for a while (because I’ve been too busy / lazy**) so I thought it was about time I roused myself sufficiently to put another batch together based, once again, on the tried-and-trusted “alphabetical list” method (i.e. they’re in no particular order except that ordained by the alphabet).

Learning Table…

If you’ve missed any of the previous batches (Learning Tables 1 – 6), you can find them here.

Once again, they’re from a couple of authors (Miss K. Elles and Georgia Banton) and if you’re especially keen to discover “who done what” the metadata will tell you everything you need to know, including the year they were created in case you were wondering about their relevance to the Spec. you’re currently teaching / following.

As with previous Tables, they’re a mixture of formats (some are built around Assessment Objectives, some are built around PEEL and some are just Notes in no particular configuration). All, however, have been left in their original Word format in case you want to edit them for any reason.

Knowledge Organiser…

Cultural Variations in Attachment
Custodial sentencing
Data Types
Defining and measuring crime
Definitions of Abnormality
Descriptive Data
Differential association
Dispositional Explanations
Duck’s Phase Theory AO1 and AO3
Equity Theory AO1 and AO3
Evaluating Findings
Evolutionary explanations for food preferences
Experiments
Explanations for the success and failure of dieting
Eysenck’s theory
Factors Affecting Attraction – Filter Theory AO1 and AO3
Factors Affecting Attraction – Physical Attractiveness AO1 and AO3
Factors Affecting Attraction – Self-Disclosure AO1 and AO3
Features of the Memory Stores
Fight or Flight Response
Genetic and neural explanations
Infant Caregiver Interactions
Interference

* You say Po-tart-oh, I say Po-Tate-oh

** Please delate according to your current state of credulity.

Graphic Organiser: W3 | Paragrapher

Saturday, March 16th, 2019

This organiser is based around the W3 (What? Why? Where?) method of structuring information and ideas and it can be used in two main ways:

Firstly, as a way of preparing structured notes about a theory, method or concept.

Secondly as a means of creating a solid, consistent, paragraph structure for answering essay-type questions (questions that test skills of knowledge, interpretation and evaluation). Used in this way it’s similar in scale and scope to a whole range of structuring mnemonics (from PEEL to PERC and all points in between…) with which you may be familiar.

One salient feature of the W3 organiser, however, is that it’s extremely simple for students to remember and apply:

  • Topic: The organiser starts with a topic to consider, such as a theory.
  • What (do you think is important)?
    In this section students identify something significant they want to say about the theory / concept / method.
  • Why (do you think it’s important)?
    A brief explanation of why they think this idea is important.
  • Where (is the evidence, for and against)?
    In this section students identify and briefly explain examples of evidence (such as studies) for and against the theory (or, if the topic was research methods, this section might look at strengths and weaknesses).
  • Sociology in Focus for AS: Methods Resources

    Wednesday, March 13th, 2019
    Overview Map

    The final set of resources to accompany the free Sociology in Focus AS textbook is for Research Methods aka “Everyone’s Favourite Module” (Said no-one. Ever).

    Although the textbook is aimed at AQA, everyone, everywhere, does research methods so there’s little here that won’t be familiar, whatever the Specification.

    Probably.
    I’d be inclined to check, though.
    Just-in-case.

    If you’ve been following these posts over the past few weeks (and if you haven’t you might want to think about Registering with the Blog to ensure you’re notified whenever a new post happens along) you’ll be familiar with the format – activity answers, spider-diagrams, worksheets and teaching tips – and so won’t be disappointed that this is exactly what you’re getting here.

    Or maybe you will. Who really knows?

    To be a bit more specific, the bundle features:

    Worksheet

    An Overview Map that sets out the broad content of the Unit in terms of the different Modules. This can be useful as a way of introducing the Unit and giving students a broad outline of the content they will be expected to cover.

    Revision Maps: These spider diagrams map-out the textbook content on a module-by-module basis. This makes them useful for both end-of-Unit revision (the focus is on identifying keywords in the text and relating them to other, linked, content) and for introducing the basic content of each Module.

    Teaching Tips: These include suggestions for some hands-on, “Doing Sociology”, approaches to research methods, plus a general introduction to what was, at the time (around 10 years ago) a new and highly-innovative type of research method called Visual Sociology. It’s moved on a bit in the meantime and while it’s not exactly a mainstream method it’s something you might want to investigate if you have the time and / or inclination.

    Activity Answers: If you set your students any of the activities / questions in the book, a set of standard answers would be quite a handy thing to have. Luckily, I’ve written some handy suggested answers to all the questions so you don’t have to.

    Worksheets: In moderation worksheets can be a useful little weapon in your teaching armoury, particularly for small-group work / flipped learning. The worksheets involve a combination of individual and group-based tasks that can be used to consolidate and check learning.

    Religion: Two New Films

    Sunday, March 10th, 2019

    We’ve added a couple of new Religion films to the Sociology section of the site with a couple more (Secularisation / Religion and Spirituality] currently at the scripting stage.

    The first, Religion: What It Is and What It Does, features Professor Eileen Barker (of “Making of a Moonie” fame). It’s a basic introduction to two ways of defining religion: substantive definitions that focus on the essential and unique features of religion and functional definitions that conceive of religion in terms of the functions it performs for individuals and societies.

    The second, New Religions: alternative spiritualities introduces students to the concept of New Religious Movements through well-established examples such as Scientology and the Moonies, in addition to much newer movements, such as the Missionary Church of Kopimism. The film looks at some of the common characteristics of NRM’s and explores these in the context of movements such as the Moonies and Heaven’s Gate.

    Sociology in Focus for AS: Education and Methods

    Saturday, March 9th, 2019
    Overview Map

    Continuing to plough the long and lonely furrow that is AS Sociology, today’s offering is a whole bunch of resources for Education with Research Methods. These complement the Sociology in Focus for AS textbook you can pick-up for absolutely nothing if you click the link and then click another link to download it. You might want to read the text that surrounds the download link, but it’s not mandatory.

    If you follow the AQA Spec. the combination of Education and Methods will be all-too-familiar but if you follow other Specs (such as Eduqas) you’ll be pleased to know that as far as the resources go they’re basically “all about the Education” and you can forget about Methods (at least in this context).

    If you teach / study OCR then you need to be aware these are AS rather than A2 resources.

    If you teach / study outside the UK bubble you may find stuff here and in the textbook that relates to your course of study, but I can’t guarantee it.

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    Graphic Organiser: Compare and Contrast

    Monday, March 4th, 2019
    The Classic Venn Diagram

    The latest post in the series devoted to graphic organisers sees the long-overdue introduction of the Venn diagram – a classic form of graphic organiser that provides a simple, visual, way to compare and contrast two (or sometimes more) ideas.

    It’s a type that works well with something like sociological perspectives where students are frequently required to look at the similarities (compare) and differences (contrast) between perspectives like Functionalism or Marxism.

    Equally, it’s possible to apply compare and contrast techniques within perspectives – examining different types of Feminism, for example, or comparing traditional forms of Functionalism and Marxism with their more-contemporary forms.

    This PowerPoint Presentation contains two organiser examples:

    1. The conventional circular Venn diagram.

    2. A less-conventional squared version.

    While both designs serve exactly the same functional purpose, the squared version provides more writing space – something that may be useful where there are a large number of differences / similarities to identify.

    Sociology in Focus for A2: Media Resources

    Saturday, March 2nd, 2019
    Revision Maps…

    Another set of free resources to complement the Sociology in Focus For A2 textbook, this batch relates to the Mass Media option:

    Overview Map: An introductory map that provides a very general overview of the Module content.

    Revision Maps: These Unit Maps go into much more depth and detail about the content covered throughout the Module and they have a number of uses, not least as a way of introducing the content of each Unit.

    Activity Answers: If you use the activities that have been strategically placed throughout the Module, you’ll probably need some answers. Luckily, I’ve created some so you don’t have to.

    Worksheets: Can be used to set individual and group text-based tasks to consolidate and check learning. These are organised around three activity types:

  • Consolidate, designed for individual work to ensure students have “grasped the basics”.
  • Apply, designed to promote analysis, discussion and application through small-group work.
  • Evaluate, designed for whole-class discussions around arguments / evidence for and against a question.
  • Exam Focus provides Top Tips from a Senior Examiner. Be aware, however, that the specific types of questions asked may have changed in the 10 years since this text was published. There are sufficient generic tips, however, to make this section a worthwhile download.