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Archive for August, 2018

Left Realism

Friday, August 31st, 2018

In an earlier post I supplemented a PowerPoint visualisation of Left Realism’s “three-cornered approach” to understanding crime and deviance with a more-detailed explanation of how the approach generally works and revisiting this post to see if I could scavenge anything worth adding to the Crime and Deviance Channel made me think that displaying the text online probably wasn’t the most user-friendly thing to do.

Being a generally helpful kind of a guy, therefore, I thought it might be useful to reformat the Left Realism text as a pdf document.

So I did.

As you’ll see if you download the file, I haven’t changed any of the text – just reformatted it to make it a bit more-legible – but it may be that you and your students will find this format a little more flexible.

Or not.

As the case may be.

The Crime and Deviance Channel

Thursday, August 30th, 2018

The Crime and Deviance Channel now offers a wide range of free Text, PowerPoint, Audio and Video resources organised into 5 categories:

1. Theories
2. Social Distribution
3. Power and Control
4. Globalisation
5. Research Methods

Each category contains a mix of content:

Text materials range from complete pdf chapters to a variety of shorter “Update” materials (quizzes, research synopses, items “In the News”) related to key sociological theories, concepts, issues and methods.

PowerPoint resources range from single slides designed as a high-impact visual background to the explanation of key theories and concepts, to complete Presentations that can be used to introduce or illuminate a particular general theme.

Audio materials consist of 17 podcasts designed to provide background briefing material, talking points (comparing different theories for example), updates on new research and revision exercises.

Video resources generally consist of short clips (currently around 30 separate films ranging in length from 1 to several minutes) designed to illustrate key concepts, introduce new research and researchers and stimulate classroom-based thinking and discussion.

Risk: Ulrich Beck

Thursday, August 30th, 2018

If you want the concept of Risk clearly and concisely explained, who better to ask than the person who invented the idea?

So we did.

And this is what he had to say.

That’s about it really.

Oh. The clip’s only about a minute long.

Thank you.

 

The Sociological Detectives: Ch-Ch-Changing NRMs

Friday, August 24th, 2018

Another in the New Religious Movements series of PowerPoint Presentations, this uses the Sociological Detective format to investigate a “crime scene” to unearth various clues based on Eileen Barker’s observations about why NRM’s change over time.

The basic idea is that as each clue is unveiled it contributes towards an understanding of Movement change and once all the clues are revealed it should then be possible to link them to arrive at a general explanation for such changes.

While there’s nothing too sophisticated here, the Sociological Detective format plus the ability to reveal, focus on and discuss a single idea at a time might prove an interesting way to encourage students to reflect on and discuss changes in New Religious Movements.

If you need it, the Presentation contains a short video (about 90 seconds) of Barker talking about the recent development of NRM’s. You can use this clip as a piece of background information to sensitise your students to some of the ideas identified in the main Presentation. The clip is linked from YouTube (so you will need an active Internet connection to play it) rather than embedded in the Presentation to keep the PowerPoint file down to a reasonable size (around 6mb as opposed to around 125…).

Although I haven’t included one here, if you have a favourite NRM case study (from the Moonies through Scientology to Heaven’s Gate…) it could be easily integrated into the Presentation to provide an empirical background to Barker’s observations.

Participate Collections

Sunday, August 19th, 2018

If you’re Pining for Padlet now it’s started to charge and place restrictions on its free accounts, you might be looking for a new home for your shared resources.

If that’s the case (or even if it’s not) you could do worse than have a look at Participate Collections, a site where you can store resources and links – from pdf files and Word documents, through to video and web links.

Just create a free account and you’re ready to participate (pun sort-of intended)  by uploading or linking to resources. These can be organised into Collections – groups of related resources – that can be shared with anyone. You can also start different Collections, which is useful if you want to share stuff across a range of Units or Modules.

Once you start a Collection you get the option to connect and collaborate with other users to expand and enhance it. In other words, it’s easy for a range of collaborators – a teacher and their students, for example, to add resources to a common Collection. A further useful feature is the ability of collaborators to discuss the resources they’ve added.

How useful these additional options prove to be is up to you, but they do at least offer the possibility of collaborative work – between different teachers, between teachers and students and the like – if that’s a path you want to follow.

GCSE Sociology Guides: Family and Education

Friday, August 17th, 2018

GCSE Sociology resources tend to be a little thin on the ground, so it’s always nice to come across decent teacher-created material such as these two bang-up-to-the-moment Revision Guides created by Kate Henney.

The Family Guide is a 25-page document that packs in a whole range of resources covering family types, diversity, alternatives, perspectives, roles and structures (plus some stuff on exam questions and a knowledge organiser…).

The Education Pack Is a 20-page resource covering perspectives, types of school, class, ethnicity and gender, factors in achievement, marketisation and educational policy (plus exam questions and a knowledge organiser).

Although the resources are in PowerPoint format it’s easy enough to save each file as a pdf document using the Export function if you want to give your students copies.

New Religious Movements: Who Joins?

Thursday, August 2nd, 2018

Another PowerPoint in what’s rapidly evolving into some sort of NRM-based series.

This, as you might expect, complements the previously-posted Characteristics and Pathways Presentations and draws once more on the work of Professor Eileen Barker.

There’s not a lot to say about it except that it’s a deceptively-simple Presentation that identifies and outlines 5 groups who are particularly attracted to New Religious Movements.