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Posts Tagged ‘teaching’

Really Simple Series: Five-Minute Feedback Form

Wednesday, March 16th, 2016

5mfbformGetting feedback from students can help you:

  1. Check student understanding at an individual level.
  2. Reflect on your teaching in terms of how lesson content is conveyed and understood.

But it can also have practical and theoretical drawbacks:

• In terms of the former, for example, it can be time-consuming to create and interpret.

• In terms of the latter there are potential expectancy problems – students effectively tell you what they think you want to hear.

One way to avoid these problems is to develop a quick and simple way of gathering feedback – and this is where the five-minute feedback form comes into play. The form is given to students to complete at the end of a lesson and allows you to gather evaluation data in a way that focuses on identifying:

(more…)

Psychology: Teacher’s Toolkit

Thursday, June 11th, 2015

The Teacher’s Toolkit grew out of discussions and contributions on the otoolkitld TES Psychology forum and while it’s been through a number of revisions this, I think, is probably the latest (2013) version.

In basic terms it’s a massive (100-odd page) compendium of teaching ideas and activities aimed at A-level Psychology and loosely arranged around categories like:

  • Lesson Notes
  • Starters and Plenaries
  • Introductions and Simulations
  • Studies and Theories
  • Strategies (self-and peer assessment etc.).

The vast majority of the activities are simple and straightforward to grasp and put into practice (a typical activity is effectively explained in a short paragraph) and the range of the collective contributions from numerous teachers is truly impressive.

Download Toolkit

Sociologists?

While the Toolkit is aimed at Psychology teachers (the clue is in the title) and some of the activities are aimed specifically at teaching and learning explicitly psychological theories, concepts and studies, there’s still a great deal here that Sociology teachers can take from the Toolkit (albeit with the need for a bit of tinkering to orientate activities towards sociological interests and concerns).

Flipped Classrooms

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

The Flipped Classroom is something of a rarity in contemporary educational thinking and practice in that the concept is based on a reasonably-sound argument (at least as far as something like a-level study is concerned), namely that in an exam system designed to test a range of weighted skills (knowledge, understanding, application, evaluation…) it makes sense to organise teaching time around the best possible ways to teach and learn these skills. In other words, where something like evaluation is highly-rewarded in the exam it makes sense to devote precious classroom time to developing and honing this skill, rather than using said time to focus on something (like acquiring knowledge) that can be usefully carried-on outside the classroom via various forms of guided learning.

While flipping the classroom may (or may not) be “the future”, 10 Reasons Flipped Classrooms Could Change Education is an interesting overview of why you might want to look at this idea further (and includes some reasons why you might not…).

Surveying teachers in the classroom: Blended Learning on the Rise

Monday, March 16th, 2015

Short article and infographic on how teachers are using different types of technology for blended learning.

Flipped Classrooms

Saturday, April 26th, 2014

If you’re looking to flip your classroom anytime soon, you might find this article interesting (and even if you’re not, you might still find it useful if you use video in the classroom).