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Posts Tagged ‘postmodernity’

Simulacra and Hyperreality

Wednesday, October 12th, 2016

sim_coverI’ve called this a “Lesson Outline” (rather than Plan) because it’s designed to introduce and to some extent explain the related concepts of simulacra and hyperreality using practical examples to illustrate the processes.

What the Outline does is treat the related concepts of simulacra and hyperreality in more-depth than in usually the case with most Sociology A-Level textbooks; this isn’t a criticism of such books, rather an observation that there’s rarely enough space available to treat the concepts with the depth I think they deserve. In this respect the Outline details 1sr, 2nd and 3rd order simulacra and, in relation to the latter, hyperreality.

Whether or not you chose to go with the practical stuff is really up to you – it’s indicative rather than prescriptive – and there are no fancy timings or whatever to guide you through your use of the materials.

I have included a short (3 minute) video resource (https://youtu.be/ilps5xefBp8) you can use alongside the printed resource – again, nothing too fancy or prescriptive, just 6 short (around 30 seconds) clips you can integrate into your lesson if you so choose.

Download Lesson Outline (pdf)

Postmodernity and Sociological Theory

Wednesday, October 5th, 2016

This is the second of a two-part series looking at the relationship between modernitypostmod_cover, postmodernity and the development of sociological theory and in this set of Teaching Notes the focus is on two main areas:

1 Identifying the basic economic, political and cultural characteristics of postmodernity.

2, Outlining a range of sociological theories we can loosely associate with postmodernity.

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Understanding Crime and Deviance in Postmodernity: Part 2 – Deviance as Harm

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2016

blog_crime2The Part 1 Workbook looked at some general criticisms of conventional (positivist) approaches to understanding crime and criminals and the Part 2 Workbook builds on this critique by outlining an alternative approach based on the concept of social harm.

This contemporary approach argues we need to widen the way we see “crime” to include various forms of “detrimental activity” visited by “governments and corporations upon the welfare of individuals”. In this respect the Workbook covers four major areas:

• What are social harms?

• Elite culpabilities

• Crimes of the powerful

• A Critique of Risk

As with Part 1, key ideas and concepts are identified and outlined and the Workbook includes space for students to test their knowledge and understanding through a small number of simple critical tasks.

If you want to consolidate ideas about Crimes of the Powerful try our video short, featuring David Whyte’s research, available on-demand to rent or buy.

 

Understanding Crime and Deviance in Postmodernity: Part 1

Monday, March 21st, 2016

blog_crime1Although the concept of a “postmodern criminology” is, for various reasons, highly problematic this doesn’t mean that newer approaches to understanding and explaining crime don’t have something to offer the a-level sociologist. In this two-part extravaganza, therefore, we can look at two (yes, really) dimensions to this criminological shift through the medium of a couple of lovingly-prepared workbooks.

The first workbook – a critique of conventional criminology – helps students understand some of the points-of-conflict between conventional (positivist) and postmodern criminologies, with the focus on areas like:

• The ontological reality of crime

• The myth of crime

• Criminalisation, punishment and pain

• Crime control

The workbook identifies and explains these ideas and also includes space for students to test their knowledge and understanding through relatively simple critical tasks.

Some Notes on Constitutive Criminology

Monday, March 7th, 2016

While the concept of a “postmodern criminology” may be somewhat nebulous, to say the least, the ideas underpinning constitutive criminology may be the closest we have.

The basic idea here is to adopt what Henry and Milovanovic (1999) call a holistic approach, involving a ‘duality of blame’ that moves the debate away from thinking about the ‘causes of crime’ and the ‘obsession with a crime and punishment cycle’, towards a ‘different criminology’ theorised around what Muncie (2000) terms social harm. To understand crime we have to ‘move beyond’ notions centred around ‘legalistic definitions’. We have to include a range of ideas (poverty, pollution, corporate corruption and the like) in any definition of harm and, more importantly, crime (which, as Henry and Milovanovic put it, involves ‘the exercise of the power to deny others their own humanity’)

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Amoral Panics: Part 3

Wednesday, June 10th, 2015

While the two previous posts looked at moral panics from two different perspectives (“from below” in the case of interpretivist approaches and “from above” in the case of hegemonic neo-Marxist positions) a different way of looking at the concept, developed by Waiton (2008), is to consider contemporary forms of panic in the context of a changing moral order; one where the “moral certainties” of modern society is replaced by the “moral uncertainties” of late/postmodern society.

Amoral Panics

Waiton argues, in this respect, that late/postmodern societies are characterised by amoral panics. Moral panics are increasingly rare because there is no-longer a clear and coherent sense of moral order to protect – something he attributes to “a collapse in the ‘faiths’ of the right and left, that cohered society in the past”. If there is no clear sense of a moral order, just a number of competing moral interpretations, there can be no sense of moral panics being engineered.

This doesn’t mean panics no-longer occur, merely that their quality is amoral “a form of moralising without any wider system of meaning”. In other words, while panics have a moral dimension – they involve ideas about what is good or bad for society – they are not specifically related to any sense of an overriding moral order. (more…)

Modernity and Postmodernity

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

Don’t know your Foundationalism from your anti-essentialism, your agile corporation from your Post-Fordist or, indeed your simulacra from your elbow?

If reality causes you confusion (but you’ve got a sneaking suspicion that “the Truth” is out there, somewhere) then this free book chapter (taken from A2 Sociology for AQA), is probably just what you need to start bluffing your way through the highways and the byways of PoMo with the best of them…

Using Analogies in A-level Sociology

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015

Analogies are a useful teaching tool in sociology for a number of reasons:

  1. They can help students to understand something complex and unfamiliar by using ideas that are relatively simple and familiar.
  2. They can be used to engage students in collaborative work, the outcome of which is an expansion of their knowledge and understanding through the connections they are able to make.
  3. They encourage students to generate their own ideas, arguments and understanding in a relatively gentle and supportive context.
  4. The role of the teacher changes from simple didacticism to one of questioning, guidance, engagement and synthesis.

For these reasons analogies can be used as both collaborative classroom exercises and for flipped teaching (students prepare their work outside the classroom and enter the classroom prepared to discuss their understanding).

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Media Representations

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

soldier

If you’re looking for a good illustration of what Baudrillard meant by “The Gulf War Did Not Take Place” this article is worth checking-out.