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Posts Tagged ‘inequality’

GCSE AQA Sociology Revision Guides

Friday, January 13th, 2017

I recently came across this interesting set of guides for the AQA Spec., written by Lydia Hiraide of The BRIT School.

The guides are dated 2013 – and although I’m not sure how they might fit into the latest Specification, I’m guessing there’s going to be a lot here that’s still relevant.

You can download the following guides in pdf format:

Socialisation

Family

Education

Crime and deviance

Social inequality

Unit 1: Revision guide

 

7 Sims in 7 Days – Day 7: Cards, Cakes and Class

Monday, October 3rd, 2016

sim_cakesThe final offering in what no-one’s calling “The Wonderful Week of Sims” is designed to give students practical experience of social inequality based on the unequal distribution of economic resources (wealth) – the eponymous “cake” of the title. While this can be an end in itself – a central part of the sim is the physical segregation of students within the same classroom – it can also be the building block for an examination of the possible consequences of such inequality.

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Visualising Class Structures

Sunday, September 18th, 2016

class_coverThis PowerPoint Presentation, designed for whole-class teaching, features visual representations of nine different class structures / variations,  accompanied by some of the key ideas involved in each classification. Brief background Notes for teachers are also included with each slide.

The slides are intended to be a visual backdrop teachers can use to introduce / discuss different class structures.

If you prefer a self-running PowerPoint Show format (without Notes), use this link.

SCTV Weekly Round-Up

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

A little late, but worth the wait. Probably.

Our weekly round-up of the sites and stories that are hot.

Or not.

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Weekly Round-Up

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

This week’s round-up of all the sites, scenes and sounds that piqued our interest…

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Weekly Digest

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

All the links that caught our eye this past week in one handy post…

Sociology

Education

Failure discourse: Govt must launch royal commission into ‘failing’ state system, says private school head”

Methods in Context Mark Scheme

Government backs down over plan to make all schools academies

Thousands of supply teachers could lose out on more than £200 a month owing to changes to tax relief rules

Professionalisation of governance: “Without parent governors, schools face uphill battle to engage families”

The impact of longer school days

I’ve seen the future and it doesn’t look good: “I Teach At A For-Profit College: 5 Ridiculous Realities”

Students who use digital devices in class ‘perform worse in exams’

Genes that influence how long you stay in education uncovered by study

Crime

Manchester’s Heroin Haters – Vigilante violence?

Insecure working as social harm? Some thoughts on theorising low paid service work from a harm perspective

Revealed: London’s new violent crime hotspots

Chief Constable confirms election expenses probe involves 2 Cornish MPs, and his own boss

Street crime resources

Extending the Web: “Legal highs brought low as councils use banning orders to curb use”

Tough talk on crime has led to a crisis in Britain’s prisons

Corporate / White-collar crime “David Cameron to introduce new corporate money-laundering offence”

Wealth, Poverty, Welfare

Poverty by Design? “Sink estates are not sunk – they’re starved of funding”

Top 25 hedge fund managers earned $13bn in 2015 – more than some nations

Media

18 Baffling Tropes Hollywood Can’t Stop Using

Selling Shame: 40 Outrageous Vintage Ads Any Woman Would Find Offensive | Mental Floss UK

The General Strike to Corbyn: 90 years of BBC establishment bias

How to Fabricate Front Page News

Social Inequality

Class, Culture and Education – a good discussion piece for students: “Why working-class actors are a disappearing breed”

Example of different type of discrimination: “Blacklisted workers win £10m payout from construction firms”

Tax havens have no economic justification, say top economists

A Sandwich and a Milkshake? Interesting discussion point for UK inequality / tax cuts for wealthy

Methods

Statistical Artefact: Useful research Methods example “Fewer people die in hospital at weekends, study finds”

Family

Childhood / sexualistion  /media: “Magazine under fire for swimsuit tips for pre-teen girls”

Psychology

Epigenetics: “Identical twins may have more differences than meet the eye”

Esteller study: “How epigenetics affects twins” | The Scientist Magazine

The uses and misuses of “growth mindset”

Miscellaneous

The way you’re revising may let you down in exams – and here’s why

A psychologist reveals his tips for effective revision

Britain at a glance – lots of lovely data in easy-to-read formats!

How to create better study habits that work for you

 

Sociology Review

Sunday, August 2nd, 2015

Like its A-level Psychology counterpart, Sociology Review offers good-quality articles and support materials designed to help students gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of both Sociology and the requirements of the A-level exam.

The publishers, Hodder Education, have started to develop a strong web presence for the print magazine, part of which involves offering some nice freebies related to each issue’s content, which you can check-out here:

Sample Magazine – actually, if you know where to look (and we do…), 4 free online sample magazines with articles based around the following themes:

  1. Family
  2. Culture and Identity
  3. Globalisation and Inequality
  4. Crime

Free Resources  include activities, supplementary notes, posters and podcasts (but, unlike our more-privileged psychological cousins, there are no short video clips).

From Flipped Classrooms to Flipped eBooks…

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

A flipbook is just an online version of a magazine – you view and “flip” the pages just as you would if you were reading a printed publication.

While they’re not everyone’s cup of hot chocolate I rather like them – and to prove this here’s one I made earlier from one of Janis Griffith’s GCSE Sociology eBooks on social inequality.

GCSE Social Inequality Flipbook

Social Inequality: applying cultural and economic capital

Friday, March 27th, 2015

airbagYou may be familiar with Robert Putnam’s ideas about social capital (“Bowling Alone”), where he argues that a key feature of late modern societies is the breakdown of large-scale, organised, social networks (such as political parties, trade unions and the like).

His latest work – Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis, 2015 – features an intriguing and interesting idea that can be slotted into exam answers whenever you need to reference and explain social inequalities.

Putnam uses the concept of “social air bags” to argue affluent groups are able to protect their children from the consequences of their behaviour in ways that are rarely open to poorer social groups; just as an air bag may protect you from the consequences of a car crash, “social air bags” can protect you from the consequences of various social collisions – from finding yourself in trouble with the law to making sure you don’t fall behind at school.

In a nutshell, the concept relates to the various ways some social groups are better-placed to use their higher levels of cultural and economic capital to protect their children from the potentially negative consequences of their life choices.

Gender and Inequality

Monday, March 9th, 2015

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is always a go-to source for all types of statistical data on a variety of topics and this one is no exception.

With links to both gender and social inequality “Welcome to unequal England” uses ONS data to show how inequalities impact on some of the most important life chances of all – the ability to live a long, healthy, life.

Racist Dogs and Institutional Racism

Thursday, March 5th, 2015

Ferguson policeDogs can’t, of course, be racist – but their handlers certainly can – and if you’re looking for a contemporary example of systemic racism then the US Department of Justice report into the killing of Michael Brown probably fits the bill.

Education and Inequality

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015

The relationship between education and social inequality is a (necessarily) complex one and this is reflected in this piece by Danny Dorling.

If you prefer a more easily-digestible read, try this instead

Meritocracy: Putting it Bluntly?

Wednesday, January 21st, 2015

The recent public spat between Chris Bryant MP and singer-songwriter James Blunt about the “over-representation” of rich, white, males in the Arts provides a neat and interesting backdrop to the concept of meritocracy.

Is it just a question of “cream rising to the top” – or does it involve more-complex ideas about inequality and privilege?

If you want to take things a little further, the article can also be used to consider Functionalist (Davis-Moore thesis) and Neo-functionalist (Saunders) arguments and refutations.

7 days of social science research

Wednesday, August 27th, 2014

This ESRC YouTube page contains 7 short (5 – 6 minute) introductory films covering a range of topics that can be used to introduce, highlight and illustrate various aspects of the mainly AS Specification:

  • Image and identity
  • Charity
  • Poverty and inequality
  • Migration
  • Family and relationships
  • Work and employment
  • Happiness and wellbeing

Ethnicity

Monday, July 28th, 2014

Set of free films from the University of Manchester with the focus on ethnicity.

These short – 3 – 4 minute – films currently focus on two aspects of ethnicity – it’s relationship to inequality (employment and health) and identity – examining different ways to talk about ethnic identity.

Social Inequality: Missing the Bus?

Saturday, April 19th, 2014

Grasping the full extent of social inequality on a global scale can be a daunting prospect, but a recent Oxfam report uses a double-decker bus analogy to help students get to grips with the full extent of global wealth disparities…