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Archive for January, 2017

The Manifest and Latent Functions of CAGE

Monday, January 30th, 2017

While mnemonics are not everyone’s favourite hot beverage I’ve always found them a very useful memory device – and I’m particularly fond of CAGE (Class, Age, Gender, Ethnicity) and its less-exulted compatriots CAGES (…Sexuality) and CAGED (…Disability)* for a couple of reasons:

Firstly, it has a simple manifest function for students. If you’re ever stuck for evaluation ideas in an exam it’s always possible to say something useful about class, age, gender or ethnic differences. Use it as a kind of “Get Out of Jail Free” card you can play whenever you need a quick prompt to get an answer flowing.

Secondly a latent function of CAGE for teachers is that you can use it to illustrate the concepts of structure and action in a simple and memorable way using the distinction between social and personal identities.

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Braithwaite and Restorative Justice: Crime Prevention and Control

Thursday, January 26th, 2017

Having spent the past couple of years working on Psychology films we’ve decided to turn our efforts towards a new volume of crime videos – a follow-up to “Shortcuts to Crime and Deviance Volume 1” imaginatively called “Volume 2”. We burnt the candle at both ends to come up with that corker.

Anyway, one of the scripts I’m currently working on (Social Constructionism) includes the work of John Braithwaite and it struck me that one aspect of crime prevention that tends to get crowded-out of textbook discussions amidst all the talk about zero-tolerance policing, target-hardening and a general “war on crime” is his notion of restorative justice.

This is something of a shame, not only because it offers a way out of the seemingly endless “retribution cycle” of offending – punishment – reoffending but also because it’s a useful (and somewhat rare) example of a broadly social constructionist approach to crime prevention that can be used by students as a counterweight to the variety of prevention strategies that focus, to varying degrees, on an acceptance of crime and a strategy of “making crime more difficult”.

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EySKuBe: The Addiction Simulation

Wednesday, January 18th, 2017

To complement the free chapter  on addictive behaviour you can give your students a taste of addictive behaviour with this simple – and harmless – simulation.

This was originally created by Todd Campbell (Texas A & M University) and the instructions here are filtered through the work of Linda Walsh (University of Northern Iowa)

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Behind the Statistics DVD

Friday, January 13th, 2017

Now available on DVD, the third in a trilogy of related psychology research methods films (the first and second look at Experimental and Non-Experimental Research Methods respectively) examines how statistical data are collected, compared and explained through an examination of three key issues in this process:

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GCSE AQA Sociology Revision Guides

Friday, January 13th, 2017

I recently came across this interesting set of guides for the AQA Spec., written by Lydia Hiraide of The BRIT School.

The guides are dated 2013 – and although I’m not sure how they might fit into the latest Specification, I’m guessing there’s going to be a lot here that’s still relevant.

You can download the following guides in pdf format:

Socialisation

Family

Education

Crime and deviance

Social inequality

Unit 1: Revision guide

 

Sociology ShortCuts: State Crime

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

The ShortCuts series of films Is designed to give teachers and students very brief introductions to / overviews of a range of contemporary sociological ideas through the medium of leading academics.

In this film, Professor Sandra Walklate offers a quick (2-minute) illustrated introduction to the concept of “the criminality of the State”.

Free Chapter: The Psychology of Addictive Behaviour

Tuesday, January 10th, 2017

The third – and probably final – free chapter from Holt and Lewis’ “A2 Psychology: The Student’s Textbook”, this one covers addictive behaviour in terms of main areas:

1. Models

Biological, cognitive and learning models of addiction, including explanations for initiation, maintenance and relapse

Explanations for specific addictions, including smoking and gambling

2. Factors affecting addictive behaviour

Vulnerability to addiction including self-esteem, attributions for addiction and social context of addiction

The role of media in addictive behavior 

3. Reducing addictive behaviour

Models of prevention, including theory of reasoned action and theory of planned behaviour

Types of intervention, including biological, psychological, public health interventions and legislation, and their effectiveness.

 

Psychology Factsheets: Buy or DIY?

Monday, January 9th, 2017

A couple of months ago this blog featured examples of Sociology Factsheets created and sold by the Curriculum Press and this month it’s the turn of Psychology, of which I’ve found the following examples:

 

As with their sociological counterparts the basic design rules are relatively simple:

  • short topic notes focused on key knowledge points
  • illustrative examples
  • overviews of advantages and disadvantages
  • exam tips
  • short “test yourself” questions

 

There are around 200 Factsheets currently available – and their web site does some good deals on subscription purchases – but an alternative is to get your students to make their own.

All you need is some simple DeskTop Publishing software (like the free Serif PagePlus Starter Edition – it’s easy to learn and surprisingly powerful) and a little bit of planning and guidance from you…

 

A2 Psychology: Free Chapter on Relationships

Friday, January 6th, 2017

A couple of months ago I posted a free chapter on Research Methods  from Holt and Lewis’ “A2 Psychology: The Student’s Textbook” and this latest offering is on Relationships and covers three main areas:

  1. The formation, maintenance and breakdown of romantic relationships

Theories of the formation, maintenance and breakdown of romantic relationships: e.g. reinforcement-affect theory, social exchange theory, sociobiological theory

  1. Human reproductive behavior

The relationship between sexual selection and human reproductive behaviour
Evolutionary explanations of parental investment: e.g. sex differences, parent-offspring conflict.

  1. Effects of early experience and culture on adult relationships

The influence of childhood and adolescent experiences on adult relationships, including parent-child relationships and interaction with peers.
The nature of relationships in different cultures.

 

Crime, Deviance and Methods: Self-report Questionnaire

Thursday, January 5th, 2017

Opportunities for students to link crime, deviance and research methods in a practical way are often limited by the constraints of time and space – but one simple approach that can be used effectively in the classroom is a self-report crime questionnaire. Although there are a few of these kicking around (from Ann Campbell’s onward…) this is a relatively recent one I’ve put together based on questions contained in the UK Crime and Justice Survey.

It can be downloaded as a Word document so that you can amend it easily (you may not want to include all the 40+ questions and you may want to substitute some of your own…). 

The document suggests some possible classroom uses for the questionnaire – from data and methodological analysis if you’re leaning toward research methods to using the data to think critically about official crime statistics based on categories like age and gender.